Snobbery on the scene

SDsalsaguy

Administrator
Staff member
#41
Sure... which is why I think we're talking about "scenes" vs. salsa dancers, or Lindy dancers, etc., as if they were all the same.
 
#42
I hope no one thought that I thought that people were meaning anything other than the scence (i didn't think people were talking about the individual people). I just find that everything goes in all directions (I've had some Lindy people ask me how in the world I can stand the snobbery in the ballroom scene and vice versa). I think a lot of it is a person's individual perspective on different scenes.
 
#43
setsuna713 said:
I think a lot of it is a person's individual perspective on different scenes.
And, it's easy to forgive bad behavior in the dance communities we're part of while criticizing the same behavior in the communities we visit.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
#44
Yes. Been there, done that. My own personal clique is just friends out to have fun, to me. I bet, to outsiders, it seems pretty snobbish and exclusionary. :(
 

SDsalsaguy

Administrator
Staff member
#45
No problems setsuna. And yes Jenn, I'm definately in the boat you describe. Some little asian grandma knows that I'll never turn down her requests to dance while other dnacers in my regular club won't even approach "my" table unless they're passing it on their way on/off the floor. Oh well... :?
 

Spitfire

Well-Known Member
#46
I believe that some people observe the same groups of people sitting at the same spot every time and assume it's cliquish, but that doesn't mean that they are going to limit their dancing to or only be friendly with those in that "group". This has been the case at most every dance I've attended.
 
#47
pygmalion said:
Oh heck! I know I'm opening a big, slithery can of worms, here, but it's been mentioned twice already today. Snobbery on the swing scene.

Do you think that there really is elitism on the swing scene, or is it just a misconception? If there is snobbery, does it involve the music or the dances or both? Where did it come from? Is it justified? What effect, if any, do you think it has on newbies or outsiders (or do swing dancers not care? LOL) Have you experienced it? Thoughts, anyone? :wink: 8)
I was thinking about this just now.

There certainly is snobbery among some Lindy Hoppers in that they look down on people dancing 'Jive' or 'Ceroc' as we call it here.

But there's something else that concerns me. I wouldn't describe it as snobbery, but rather, exclusivity.

Several of the better dancers in London tend to hang out together at dances. Some of them wear t-shirts with slogans like 'Lindy Hop is better than anything else in the universe'. They refer to each other on message boards with comments like 'Anyone going to xyz tonight? xxxxxx will be there'. I am not part of this group, but do have other friends I sometimes sit with and always try to talk to if I see them at a dance. So you could say I have my own group.

I think that people will tend to sit with other people rather than sit on their own, so that is an understandable human trait. As for the t-shirts, I think that when people discover Lindy Hop they get very enthusiastic about it, and feel they want to tell people. I can get pretty carried away myself when I am enjoying dancing. I do think it's probably healthy to have some other interests as well as dancing.

I do also think that this group CAN appear cliquey in that they appear to be an exclusive club that it's hard to join. You know when you walk up to someone intending to ask them to dance, and they are sitting with a group of friends? It can be hard to approach an individual in a group and the perceived attitude of the group to outsiders is a big factor.

Individuals dance with other individuals, but the forming of groups is a human trait and will tend to happen. I suppose ultimately, I would like to be open to dance with other individuals, and for them to be open to dance with me, and I fear that when dancers identify too strongly with a group it becomes a barrier to openness.

I hope that makes sense :wink:
 

Sagitta

Well-Known Member
#48
It does huey, and it takes courage to go and ask when that is the case. One approach of mine is to go to the group and inobtrusively tap or get the attention of the lady I want to dance with. The other brash way is stride up and simply look at the person whom you want to dance with and ask.
 
#49
Sagitta said:
Lindy hoppers tend to be snobbish.
I am new to this board and was searching around getting a feel for what is out there when I came upon this. Wow! What a statement.

I am a lindyhopper who has had a snobbish experience with the WC crowd. Here I was enrolled in my first WC class and trying to expand my knowledge of partner dancing when I was being looked at from down the nose from the westies who know that I'm a lindyhopper. That was of course until they danced with me and realized that I know a lot about connection. When they complimented me, I would just smile and say that in lindy you have to have great connection or the dance won't work.

Also, for those who think ballet dancers are snobs. Guess what? I've taken ballet since I was 4 and now I teach it.

I guess I'm a double snob.

For those who have had snobbish experiences with lindyhoppers and with ballet dancers. I'm sorry that you've had poor experiences, but don't judge all by the same cover.
 

Sagitta

Well-Known Member
#50
Lulu said:
Sagitta said:
Lindy hoppers tend to be snobbish.
I am new to this board and was searching around getting a feel for what is out there when I came upon this. Wow! What a statement.

For those who have had snobbish experiences with lindyhoppers and with ballet dancers. I'm sorry that you've had poor experiences, but don't judge all by the same cover.
Welcome to df Lulu!! My statement is merely a comment on the dance scenes, based on observation. It does not mean/imply that I apply this blanket statement to everyone who belongs to the lindy scene.
 

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