songs that give you hope

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#1
Beauty (Shaya?)"you'll find beauty in the toughest of places and I will be thinking of you"
Its the Heart that Matters Most (charlotte church) "time to spread some hope, make the spirits rise...do you see the wonderin their eyes...time to speak of love, hold each other close...cuz its the heart that matters most"


YOURS?
 

cornutt

Well-Known Member
#3
"Like a bridge over troubled waters, I will lay me down..."

Ah yes, Simon and Garfunkel were incredibly talented songwriters and performers. Here are a few totally random selections of songs that I like to listen to, or just think about, for a pick-me-up:

Stray Cats, "Stray Cat Strut"
Asia, "Heat of the Moment"
Rush, "The Camera Eye" (or "The Spirit of Radio" or especially "Tom Sawyer")
Byrds, "Eight Miles High"
Kansas, "Icarus: Borne on Wings of Steel"
Police, "Invisible Sun" (or, for comedy, "On Any Other Day")
Yes, "I've Seen All Good People" (there are a bunch of other Yes songs that work too, like "Roundabout" or the gorgeous "Heart of the Sunrise" or "And You And I" or even "Sound Chaser" if I'm in a somewhat different mood.)

When I graduated from college, back in the early '80s, I accepted a job offer in South Florida. It was a time in my life when I needed a fresh start, and so I took it even though it meant moving away from friends and family. It was a time of both trepidation and hope. The day that I took the on-ramp onto I-75 in Chattanooga to start the trip, at that moment Roxy Music's "More Than This" came on the radio. It was a fortuitious concidence, and I adopted that as my theme song for the move and months afterwards.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#4
I'd have to think on this a bit more--and sort out the "giving hope" songs from the "guaranteed cheering up" songs.

But, the S&G reminded me of one of my favorites of theirs--America.

That one reminds me so strongly of college--the feelings of being on an adventure, and not knowing where or how it will end, and being a bit scared but happy at the same time. And the silliness that reminds you of the little things in life ('Laughin' on the bus/playing games with the faces/she said the man in the gabardine suit is a spy/I said be careful his bowtie is really a camera'). And the hope of new love ('Let us be lovers/we'll marry our fortunes together').

And (BONUS!) it's danceable, to boot!
 

Medira

New Member
#6
Beauty (Shaya?)"you'll find beauty in the toughest of places and I will be thinking of you"
Its the Heart that Matters Most (charlotte church) "time to spread some hope, make the spirits rise...do you see the wonderin their eyes...time to speak of love, hold each other close...cuz its the heart that matters most"


YOURS?
"Beauty" by Shaye. :) It makes me smile to know that you still listen to that song...

For me, I'll add some love to Peaches' mention of Simon and Garfunkel's "America", and I'd also like to add in a vote for "Run to the Water" by Live
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#7
Oh, and BTW, Cornutt...

Did you notice? Yet another song that I've mention from before I was born--10 years prior, for "America."

:p ;-)
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#9
"Beauty" by Shaye. :) It makes me smile to know that you still listen to that song...

For me, I'll add some love to Peaches' mention of Simon and Garfunkel's "America", and I'd also like to add in a vote for "Run to the Water" by Live
today in fact...and THANKS :cool:
 

DWise1

Well-Known Member
#10
Most of Simon and Garfunkel's songs were poetry set to music. I went to Melodyland to see the Mamas & Papas and got turned onto their lead act, Simon and Garfunkel, instead.

But rather than being able to think of any song that gives me hope (since classic rock is much rarer on the radio now -- I know almost absolutely nothing about popular music post-1972 -- , I mainly listen to "classical" again, Spanish radio, and some swing that I have on tape or on CD at work), I find hope in what I no longer identify with. The prior time I was single, 30 years ago, I had been so alienated growing up that I identified with such songs as bemoaned being an outsider and being alone, particularly People are Strange. But recently when I heard that song on the radio again after several years, I didn't identify with it. Nor with Ain't Got No One ("no tengo a nadie"). Nor the slue of "I'm so all alone" songs. Because I'm no longer an outsider and because I'm not all alone. I have lots of friends.


Though I have to admit, a bit guiltily, that a few months ago when I Will Survive came on the radio for the first time in several years, I did give the lyrics a close listen.


Otherwise, for hope and inspiration, there's still An die Freude as put to music by Ludwig van.
 
#11
I realized that I do not have a song which invariably lifts up my mood. There are some songs I especially like to listen to when I am in a bad mood, but they do not make me feel better.
 

DWise1

Well-Known Member
#13
Aaah, a little of the Ludwig van.

Perfect to make you ready for a bit of the ultra-violence.
Almost hate to admit that's where I got it from. BTW, if you know a little Russian, then some of the slang will make sense since they're just borrowings from Russian. Eh, droogie? ("droog" == "friend" -- please pardon my crude transliteration from Cyrillic).

A few quotes about English vocabulary:
"English is the results of the efforts of Norman men-at-arms to make dates with Saxon barmaids in the 9th century"
(H. Beam Piper, from "Fuzzy Sapiens")

"English doesn't borrow from other languages. English follows other languages down dark alleys, knocks them over, and goes through their pockets for loose grammar."
(unknown)

"The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary."
James D. Nicoll


Trivia, according to Richard Lederer on KPBS, San Diego:

Vocabulary Sizes:
English 616,000
German 185,000
Russian 130,000
French 100,000

English adds about 5000 new words per annum.

Only about 25% of English vocab comes from Anglo-Saxon and a large portion of the remaining from French courtesy of the Norman Conquest in 1066.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#14
Almost hate to admit that's where I got it from. BTW, if you know a little Russian, then some of the slang will make sense since they're just borrowings from Russian. Eh, droogie? ("droog" == "friend" -- please pardon my crude transliteration from Cyrillic).



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Of COURSE that's where you got it from!!! Where else would you run across it? And, besides, what's wrong with getting it from there?

Thanks for the tip on the Russian. I was curious about WhereTF they got some of those words. I just chalked it up to some sort of period, British slang combined with the group's own terminology.
 

DWise1

Well-Known Member
#16
Of COURSE that's where you got it from!!! Where else would you run across it? And, besides, what's wrong with getting it from there?

Thanks for the tip on the Russian. I was curious about WhereTF they got some of those words. I just chalked it up to some sort of period, British slang combined with the group's own terminology.
Anthony Burgess [name?] discusses it in the foreword or appendix of the book, though it's been over 30 years and I'm sure I don't have my copy anymore. Had to do with the future popularity of Russian rock groups having a similar effect that the 1960's "British Invasion" had on US youth.

From memory:
"horrorshow" meaning "good" from "khorosho"
"viddy" meaning "to look" from "vid'et", to see
"slushy" meaning "to listen" from "slushat"


Musically speaking, have you ever listened to the movie's soundtrack by then-Walter Carlos (ie, before he became Wendy)? Listen to the piece, "Time Steps", which plays where the protagonist is fleeing his former droogs-now-ultra-violent-cops, running through the woods and arriving at "Home", the scene of their earlier crime. Then if you haven't done so before, listen to the final movement of Berlioz' "Symphonie fantastique", the "Witches' Sabbath" -- anyone who's seen "The Shining" should be very familiar with that rendering of the "Dies Irae" theme.

Blast from the Past:
At the time the movie came out, Rich Little included a reference to it on a TV variety show, Flip Wilson I think. He starts off as Gene Kelly singing, "I'm Singing in the Rain", then he goes "kick, kick, kick." No reaction from the audience. "Oops, I guess you haven't seen the movie." And he went on to his next impression, that one having made no impression.
 
#17
Oooooh Symphonie Fantastique!!!

One of my favs! Right up there with Mahler 5, Beethoven 3, and Brahms 3 . . . oh I've got listening to do ASAP!

Grammar, linguistics, and classical music all in one thread? Best thread ever!
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#18
Anthony Burgess [name?] discusses it in the foreword or appendix of the book, though it's been over 30 years and I'm sure I don't have my copy anymore. Had to do with the future popularity of Russian rock groups having a similar effect that the 1960's "British Invasion" had on US youth.

From memory:
"horrorshow" meaning "good" from "khorosho"
"viddy" meaning "to look" from "vid'et", to see
"slushy" meaning "to listen" from "slushat"


Musically speaking, have you ever listened to the movie's soundtrack by then-Walter Carlos (ie, before he became Wendy)? Listen to the piece, "Time Steps", which plays where the protagonist is fleeing his former droogs-now-ultra-violent-cops, running through the woods and arriving at "Home", the scene of their earlier crime. Then if you haven't done so before, listen to the final movement of Berlioz' "Symphonie fantastique", the "Witches' Sabbath" -- anyone who's seen "The Shining" should be very familiar with that rendering of the "Dies Irae" theme.
Hmmm...never read the book. The movie was something of a college cult staple.

I actually don't remember the soundtrack. Don't remember much of the movie, either, for that matter. I only remember the oddness, the tone of voice of the main character, a couple of scenes (the milk bar comes to mind), and some random quotes.
 

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