Standard Lady: where does she look?

#1
I went to a competition in the fall and later saw some photos of me. I had this wide-eyed, staring/spacey look. Then I had a few lessons and my posture improved. I thought this might help the problem (with my head in a different position). However, I just had another competition, saw the photos and video, and had the same gaze (unless my eyes were closed). The issue could still be postural, but in any case, where are the lady's supposed to look or direct their eyes?
 

FancyFeet

Well-Known Member
#4
I agree with Larinda - diagonally left, and as far up as you need to maintain your line. (Looking down will drop your chin, which is... not pretty.)

Exactly how far left and up varies... for example, as I have a fairly strong upper spinal curve in my 'neutral' position, my chin is in line with my upper left forearm, just below my elbow, and my eyes are looking at roughly the seam between the wall and the ceiling. When I was starting out, I was much more upright... I looked over my left wrist, and roughly straight out.

I think the key is to actually look at something - that should eliminate the spacey look :)
 

SwingingAlong

Well-Known Member
#6
Exactly how far left and up varies...
As you get more advanced you also find yourself looking at the ceiling during some figures. One thing I think looks weird is when the head is forced up and left, rather than being part of the line of the spinal stretch. For me, the line started to improve once I realised the feeling of starting it spiraling forward and to left from my ankles. I took video, and then stills from the video, and observed which parts of my body were different from other more advanced dancers. I even drew vertical lines through the balance point to make it easier to compare. The main breakthrough for me (different for everyone) was realising how much I could increase the stretch between my the top of my hips and my lower rib cage - I had been trying to stretch mainly through my rib cage and my shoulders tended to pop up as a result.
 

Mengu

Well-Known Member
#8
I'm a gentleman, but for what it's worth... If I look up (in any direction), from a distance (like a judge looking at me across the floor) my eyes look like they are rolled back in my head, it's freaky. If I keep my eyes neutral, it looks like I'm looking up. If I look down, it looks like my eyes are neutral. It has to do with the curve of the lower eyelid, and the amount of white showing (if any), between the iris and the lower lid (I have a lot of white showing). We all have different eyes, so my personal opinion, knowing how your eye differs from "average" can play a role on where you want to look, and how far to go in that direction. Because of the build of my eyes, I prefer to look at chairs in the audience, looking at top bleachers or higher (like many instructors will recommend), does not look good on me.

Easiest thing to do is film yourself a few different ways, watch it with your partner, and see which you like.
 

cornutt

Well-Known Member
#9
I didn't know that either, but it makes sense... some years ago, I figured out empirically that when I am having posture problems, it helps if I look at where the wall meets the ceiling.
 

cloey

New Member
#10
...realising how much I could increase the stretch between my the top of my hips and my lower rib cage - I had been trying to stretch mainly through my rib cage and my shoulders tended to pop up as a result.

That's EXACTLY where i'm at! Nice to hear others with same experience...
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