Taking Ballroom to the Bedroom

Status
Not open for further replies.

toothlesstiger

Well-Known Member
#41
ZOMG!
Gee, RB, where did you ever get the idea that it's normal for a woman to proposition a man in any context, dance or otherwise? I mean, it does happen, but it is much, much more common the other way around. And even when it does happen, it's not happening to Joe Average.
I never convey to the women I dance with that I would like to have them in the bedroom because I want to continue to dance with them and have fun.
Don't you think they might think the same way?
My last few relationships started on the dance floor. But I got to know the ladies off the dance floor, we went for dinner, I invited them to go dancing other places, I chased them, not the other way around.
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#46
ZOMG!
Gee, RB, where did you ever get the idea that it's normal for a woman to proposition a man in any context, dance or otherwise? I mean, it does happen, but it is much, much more common the other way around. And even when it does happen, it's not happening to Joe Average.

Don't you think they might think the same way?
My last few relationships started on the dance floor. But I got to know the ladies off the dance floor, we went for dinner, I invited them to go dancing other places, I chased them, not the other way around.
Thank you for saying it--I was debating how un-PC it would be to say "I don't pursue." Men are not such a rare commodity most women have to go propositioning dance partners. If all you do is dance, and all you talk about is dance, and you never ask them to do anything except dance, most women are going to assume you just want to dance.
 

DL

Well-Known Member
#47
And frankly, most (ie 99% of the men I social-dance with who are also available) aren't especially attractive. The 1% who are socially available are usually professionally unavailable/inappropriate (ie teachers) or gay.
Not to put too fine a point on it, but some might be available and straight and adequately attractive, but "just not that into you." It works both ways. When I stop to think about it, sometimes I'm amazed that anybody finds anybody (but then again, for some folks, "anybody" will do).
 

DL

Well-Known Member
#48
Not going to speak for DOI. But women don't go social dancing to meet a man. They go dancing to DANCE. Dancing doesn't require being attractive.
This matches my own observations/experience. :) Also, of the women I've encountered who have seemed to be looking, not all have seemed to be looking at me, and not all have sparked my own interest.

Still, romance can grow on the dance floor -- just like it can grow anywhere else.
 

madmaximus

Well-Known Member
#51
. . . I recently divorced. One of the main issues that drove the two of us apart is that my ex wouldn't go dancing with me. It would be somewhat comical to note that my ex, when we were married, was convinced I was having sex with women at the ballrooms. Nothing was further from the truth!

The fact that I was so recently married could be a factor that is hindering my love life. It's possible that once the ladies at the ballrooms find out about my divorce, and believe in it, my prospects for the bedroom will improve.

Even the ancient Greeks understood
the often-never-learned-lesson
that to love, one must be lovable;
to be lusted after, one must be lust-worthy;

and the universal irony of it all:
that looking like one who is in desperate search of either,
will seldom---if ever---find it.


Look to yourself---and not your dancing---and there you might find the answer you don't want to hear.






m
 

toothlesstiger

Well-Known Member
#52
One other thing comes to mind...
People who learn partner dancing for the specific purpose of finding, uh, romance, often could use some lessons in seduction. Otherwise they wouldn't need to turn to partner dance, any old place with people will do.
I said I did the chasing in all my relationships that started on the dance floor. That being said, I have gotten some really weird come-ons in my time. And no, I'm not telling, just in case any of the perpetrators are on this forum.
The moral of this story: being a good dancer doesn't give you a pass on social graces.
 

DL

Well-Known Member
#55
One other thing comes to mind...
People who learn partner dancing for the specific purpose of finding, uh, romance, often could use some lessons in seduction. Otherwise they wouldn't need to turn to partner dance, any old place with people will do.
I said I did the chasing in all my relationships that started on the dance floor. That being said, I have gotten some really weird come-ons in my time. And no, I'm not telling, just in case any of the perpetrators are on this forum.
The moral of this story: being a good dancer doesn't give you a pass on social graces.
Well, or perhaps some time in a long-term dance partnership could yield some good experience with relationships.

(In my heart I keep wanting to look at this thread as being about something other than casual sex.)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Dance Ads