Tango or milonga?

#21
I believe that these 2 posts answer the OP's orig. question the best. Adding to TMonkey's post, and the OP's further confusion, every American whom I have met (not bashing Amers), dance Libertango as a tango (which was written as a milonga), and Santa Maria (Gotan) as a tango (which even tells you it's a milonga). :)

So, I guess, unless you are dancing at a very 'proper' place, it's mostly one's individual interpretation or preference. Of course, when one is played as a part of a tanda, you dance the intended dance of the tanda.
First of all, thanks!

But...I don't consider Gotan or any of the other electro-tango-fusion bands to be tango/milonga music. I know they are popular and a great number of tango dancers dance to this music, yet there is nothing that makes this music tango. For a start, and at the simplest level, there's a pronounced back-beat (on 2 and 4) whereas tango has strong beats on 1 and 3. And that's just the start. Where are the tango rhythms? Where are the tango instrumental colours? (strings, bandoneon, piano...not synthesized "instruments" with an overlaid percussion track). I could go on...

Yet for many that doesn't matter, and that's perfectly OK. Even I as a purist has danced "tango" to Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata and other slow-moderate tempo melancholic/somber/intense "classical" music. So, yes one's individual interpretation is what matters.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#24
First of all, thanks!

But...I don't consider Gotan or any of the other electro-tango-fusion bands to be tango/milonga music. I know they are popular and a great number of tango dancers dance to this music, yet there is nothing that makes this music tango. For a start, and at the simplest level, there's a pronounced back-beat (on 2 and 4) whereas tango has strong beats on 1 and 3. And that's just the start. Where are the tango rhythms? Where are the tango instrumental colours? (strings, bandoneon, piano...not synthesized "instruments" with an overlaid percussion track). I could go on...
Around where I am, that kind of music is often referred to as neo-tango, (a subset of alternative music). It seems like some of groups take a pop band and then just add a bandoneon to it.

Yet for many that doesn't matter, and that's perfectly OK. Even I as a purist has danced "tango" to Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata and other slow-moderate tempo melancholic/somber/intense "classical" music. So, yes one's individual interpretation is what matters.
I'll have to give that one a try.
 
#25
I'll have to give that one a try.
Let me (us) know how it works out for you..

I had an experimental period, years ago, where I attempted to dance to almost any type of music. My belief was that the music drives the emotions which drives the dance. Surprisingly, I found there is a wide range of music to which I can dance tango. I prefer traditional early-mid 20th C. tango music - that is the foundation for the dance, after all - but there's room for expansion. Yet the music has to be intelligent and artistic, and that's highly personal.
 

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