Things you never want to hear again

FancyFeet

Well-Known Member
#44
^Good note? Ok, if they're trying to remind you to stretch up to your full height and that's an image that works for you, but if they're referring to your height and indicating that it's somehow wrong... well, that's just rude. You can't change genetics!

(The teacher early in my dance career who made regular negative comments about my height did a fair amount of damage that took me years to undo... I may be a little sensitive about height comments.)
 

MaggieMoves

Well-Known Member
#45
It's really a flavor of the month thing that was used to push various events to students - basically sales pitches. Obviously the more intelligent students would pick up on it right away though and just more or less roll their eyes.

It all depended on the event... and usually paired with some alliteration to make it more "catchy." Then repeat this saying 500x in a month. It got old quickly.
 
#46
^Good note? Ok, if they're trying to remind you to stretch up to your full height and that's an image that works for you, but if they're referring to your height and indicating that it's somehow wrong... well, that's just rude. You can't change genetics!

(The teacher early in my dance career who made regular negative comments about my height did a fair amount of damage that took me years to undo... I may be a little sensitive about height comments.)
Hahaha she is in fact just reminding me to stretch up to my full height. When I started a few months back I slouched a *lot* (one of the hazards of spending all day at a computer) so when she forced me to stand up straight for the first time I was legitimately close to two inches taller. My posture has gotten way better in general, and I sit/stand up straighter pretty much everywhere, but I do still collapse at times when I dance.
 

RiseNFall

Well-Known Member
#55
"What is the timing of that?"--asked in two particular places. I think my teacher has taken to asking me the timing of those steps... repeatedly... every time I get them wrong... in hopes of being irritating enough that I stop making the mistake. They are both syncopations and if I'm a little off in the step before, it just doesn't happen. :mad:
 

Purr

Well-Known Member
#57
"you just need to feel it" No, no, no, no. if i could just feel it I wouldn't be paying you to tell me how to DO IT. I swear i'm going to punch him in an uncomfortable place the next time he says that.
Or "Just follow"....as if that really worked either...if "following" was good unto itself, then I wouldn't need you to teach it to me....I could just "follow" and be an expert and not any lessons....phtoooey (spitting)....
 

Mengu

Well-Known Member
#59
"you just need to feel it"
I overhear these a good bit. One problem with this feedback is it's not enough information... What is it you're supposed to feel? the weight transfer? angle of the hips? the sway? the rise through the feet? the rotation? shape of the hands? the timing? When learning we can rarely focus on more than one or two things at a time, so try to pin down the important piece that's missing. Part of the problem is most male instructors aren't telling the lady what they themselves are doing, and are just expecting the lady to "feel it". That may be sufficient for a very experienced or perhaps a very inexperienced follow, but for most students in the middle, a bit more information would be nice. So I think a good question to ask when you get this feedback is, "What are you doing that I am supposed to feel?" When they list a million things, ask, "Can we focus on a few of those at a time?" This is likely a more productive plan than a punch in the family jewels.

My favorite part of taking lessons as an amateur couple is I get to hear what the instructor is telling my partner, and she gets to hear what the instructor is telling me, so our knowledge grows in parallel, understanding what each of us are supposed to do, and what we are supposed to feel from each other. Sadly this piece is often missing in pro-am instruction, but the right questions can help fill that gap.
 

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