What are you currently 'working on' in A.T.?-Vol.II

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
Following! Hehe. That was amusing. And informative. I think I did ok! Until my teacher started throwing boleos at me. I was like, what the heck was that?! Oh... right.

I guess the saying is true, don't judge a follower until you've walked a mile in her heels. Not that I wore heels. This time. :p

eta: I think this is going to vastly improve my backwards walk too. I totally understand the reaching with your whole body while keeping your leg free thing now!
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
Following! Hehe. That was amusing. And informative. I think I did ok! Until my teacher started throwing boleos at me. I was like, what the heck was that?! ...I guess the saying is true, don't judge a follower until you've walked a mile in her heels...
I think this is a very worthwhile pursuit. Not only do you gain an understanding of what a followers' experience is, but I also think ability to follow makes you a much better leader. All leaders could gain from learning to follow.
 
I really want to be able to cross-over to the woman's left side (in close-embrace)during the dance and do it two or three times very smoothly....I see this as a high-risk move and can't remember ever doing it at a Milonga. Any suggestions on what to pay attention to during this move, will be very welcome..as this is my current focus and it will really re-kindle my enthusiasm if I can add this to my social dance.
Also, I notice that it may vary widely in difficulty when dancing with different women of different heights because, I suppose, this changes the embrace?
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
Why would they? I adore Golder era tango. But when I hear some Neo tango it screams for boleo, volcada, colgada. It is unsuitable to dance CE on those songs for me.
I think that songs inspire people in different ways. That's why I'm reluctant to say anyone else's style preferences are wrong. I'll simply say that I like it, or agree with it, but not that it's wrong (the one exception being floorcraft/safety concerns).

Many songs will inspire me to do colgadas / single axis turns, but I normally do them in close embrace.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
I really want to be able to cross-over to the woman's left side (in close-embrace)during the dance and do it two or three times very smoothly....I see this as a high-risk move and can't remember ever doing it at a Milonga. Any suggestions on what to pay attention to during this move, will be very welcome..as this is my current focus and it will really re-kindle my enthusiasm if I can add this to my social dance.
Also, I notice that it may vary widely in difficulty when dancing with different women of different heights because, I suppose, this changes the embrace?
It requires a lot of twisting of the upper body (torsion, disassociation), a follower that understands this is a possibility (so she's not trying to "fix" what went wrong, from her perspective), and a lot of practice.

The "easiest" way to get to this position, is to lead her to do a side step to your left (on to her right foot), while you stay on your right foot (getting you into cross system). The next step is the key, stepping with your left foot, to your right of her right foot. It's a bit awkward at first, as it's sort of a diagonal step that you take, while leading her to step straight backwards with her left foot (to stay in cross system). When you take this step, you also have to use a fair amount of twisting/disassociation (as will the follower) to maintain the embrace.

The next step (with right foot), just be careful to go straight, and if there is any doubt at first, err on the side of going to your right a bit (almost like a back ocho for her), but the goal is really to have her go straight (although performers often do this while gradually veering to the leader's left, (CCW)).

Other ways to get into this are from a rockstep (or rockstep turn), or from the counterclockwise giro (where you come out in cross system).

There are also a myriad of ways to come of out this, back ochos, walk to the cross, giro (clockwise), or change of direction (cambio de frente) to a counter clockwise giro. I'm sure others have their own favorite ways to get into or come out of this. Pick one way, get comfortable with it, then others will be easier to pick up on.

Hope this helps.
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
I really want to be able to cross-over to the woman's left side (in close-embrace)during the dance and do it two or three times very smoothly....I see this as a high-risk move and can't remember ever doing it at a Milonga. Any suggestions on what to pay attention to during this move, will be very welcome..as this is my current focus and it will really re-kindle my enthusiasm if I can add this to my social dance.
Also, I notice that it may vary widely in difficulty when dancing with different women of different heights because, I suppose, this changes the embrace?
If you are referring to crossed system, I don't think it's all that difficult, once you are familiar with it. I suggest that you work it out with poles first.

If you are referring to parallel, I find that challenging. I've attempted it a few times recently, but I haven't found yet that it adds anything to my dance except just another step.
 
If you are referring to crossed system, I don't think it's all that difficult, once you are familiar with it. I suggest that you work it out with poles first.
If you are referring to parallel, I find that challenging. I've attempted it a few times recently, but I haven't found yet that it adds anything to my dance except just another step.
Yes, it is crossed sys. and should'nt be that difficult but seemingly it is to me.
I've noticed that Vidort's parallel left side walking is usually only once towards the beginning of the dance when he approaches the first corner in the room and has to pivot left...I think it adds more than just another step or an easier way to navigate the first left turn..I think that it turns him on, in some way, and 'loads' his dance dramaticly ..for what comes later. Don't ask me to explain this..you just have to see it and get it.
ps. it may have something to do with the build of the music, too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mekNwq3AW4E

In this dance, he uses the alternative parallel walking on the woman's left to heighten the Disney-like frolicking of two fairies fluttering their wings thru the night air.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0Q80F3efeA

hey, you either like it or you dont..me, I like it. It may be too simple for someone as sophisticated as Bordertangoman. jee jee
 

JohnEm

Well-Known Member
Yes, it is crossed sys. and should'nt be that difficult but seemingly it is to me.
I've noticed that Vidort's parallel left side walking is usually only once towards the beginning of the dance when he approaches the first corner in the room and has to pivot left...I think it adds more than just another step or an easier way to navigate the first left turn..I think that it turns him on, in some way, and 'loads' his dance dramaticly ..for what comes later.
Ricardo Vidort was well down the path of his terminal illness at the time
of the Liz Haight video. It's typical of other demonstrations with his
trademark closed side parallel walking, apilado grapevine walk,
musicality and movement in the carousel.

D'chester has given enough suggestions for me to only add that the disassociation
anti-clockwise should accompany the sidestep. I usually traspie as Oscar
Casas demonstrates and D'chester's no step at all is equally valid though
maybe a little more challenging as a leader. What is without doubt is you
need to fluidly twist to disassociate with intent and you need a partner who
confidently follows the chest - it's a relatively unusual direction to twist
initially so be prepared for some acclimatisation.

If you get it right, eventually move from the three track walk to a two track
one apilado style and then try walking outside on the closed side in parallel
as Ricardo used to. The ladies who follow it often appreciate the variation.
 
Boleos. Again.
Front or back, I am anything but graceful. Foot does strange things on its own.
Teacher straightens me out in class, then I go home to practice and mess up again.
 
Boleos. Again.
Front or back, I am anything but graceful. Foot does strange things on its own.
Teacher straightens me out in class, then I go home to practice and mess up again.
I think boleos must be quite tricky to practice by yourself - you'd need to somehow simulate the "emergency stop" impetus / energy provided by the leader, which is tricky.

I guess it might be a bit easier to work on the general free leg technique, as that's always the key to doing boleos successfully.
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
Boleos

Boleos. Again. Front or back, ....
Worked on boleos, too, but on the linear ones (rectos). Ususally put too much energy in the lead. Tried it more gently, now. Tried to do it more colgadized, to emphasize the final flick by a rebote, then tried to freeze it, and to stop it on the way back. Looks altogether easier than it really is.
 
Thanks, Dave & Peaches. Husband and I practice together, so he is providing the lead. In fact, teacher does not want me to get in the habit of trying to practice this by myself. Swinging the leg - I think you are on to something. I find I am tensing my leg muscles (sometimes the hip, sometimes the knee, sometimes the ankle) in my attempt to do the right thing, rather than staying loose. Don't know why this is so frustratingly difficult for me.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
Worked on boleos, too, but on the linear ones (rectos). Ususally put too much energy in the lead. Tried it more gently, now. Tried to do it more colgadized, to emphasize the final flick by a rebote, then tried to freeze it, and to stop it on the way back. Looks altogether easier than it really is.
So you're one of those evil nuevos types that people have warned us about.







Just kidding

 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
Yesterday I felt even more as a victim of a knife thrower: out of almost unpredictable directions knife-sharp heels flew through the air of that practica. With 2 steps and a boleo one could reach every free corner in seconds.


:(
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
Worked on boleos, too, but on the linear ones (rectos). Ususally put too much energy in the lead. Tried it more gently, now. Tried to do it more colgadized, to emphasize the final flick by a rebote, then tried to freeze it, and to stop it on the way back. Looks altogether easier than it really is.
as I have said before; all this crap about nuevo dancers; they have to be better than traditional,
 

Dance Ads