What are you currently 'working on' in A.T.?-Vol.II

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
I hope everyone realizes that boleos can be done very small, too, with no danger to anyone.
Well, I've never seen linear boleos done small, but it's not something I have any interest in, anyways. To be honest, I just don't think they look good, even in performances.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
If they are what I think they are, they couldn't be done in an apilado embrace without breaking something.

Added later:

They are not what I imagined:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2lhK7wEd0Y
Those were done slower than others that I've seen, but I don't like them any better. About the only use for those I could see, is if the leader in front of you won't get moving.

:twisted:


(and I'm not brave enough to lead the front ones, directed at me).

:shock:
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
You can lead without touching, too

If they are what I think they are, they couldn't be done in an apilado embrace without breaking something.

Added later:

They are not what I imagined:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2lhK7wEd0Y
However, this vid shows linear?

And one thing, they can be lead without breaking. But I do understand something different in breaking than you. Even if you dance openly you do not break. The connection stays stable, though you have no direct touch at the breast region.

And this is the deeper purpose of training linear boleos: To keep the connection, and to dispense energy, to learn to control the back, to and fro movements subtlly with your whole body.

You even can lead without breaking without hold at all, never touching each other, only by your body presence. This is a very good beginner´s excercise.

I wouldn't have any idea how to lead those in apilado.
Any boleo (circular or linear) is a redirected movement (ocho or forward step). Perhaps once invented by accidents. So, since you have learned the concept of the rebote (rebound), you can lead boleos.
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
Been working on my CW giro in apilado. I was doing some solo training on the dissociation movement and over-exerted my lower latisimus dorsi on both sides. It's the ressociation that is the tough part of that movement. I thought I was having a kidney problem for a day or so, but it went away. Can't wait to get back on the dance floor and see how it goes.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
Do you find the CW more difficult than the cCW? Anyway, I do so :mad:

Get well!
I don't actually find the giro to be more difficult in either direction, but I have found that certain ways of initiating it are easier in one direction rather than the other. I recently had noticed that I always did a CW turn when doing the giro from back ochos. Thus I've started trying to do the giro CCW from back ochos now. From the cross, I find it easier to do a CCW giro, but I'll occasionally do it CW, but only after pausing. From rock steps, it doesn't seem to make any difference which way I rotate, as this is the most common way I start the giro.

I guess I'm trying to combine the same old stuff in new ways (to me).
 

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