What are you working on?

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
#81
New "working on it"s:

Leading with (almost) zero arm pressure of the lady's back, especially in very close embrace (I can pull it off in open embrace but somehow I have a tendency to hold the follower more firmly in a close embrace. Less is more.)

Doing (even) smaller steps. Even when there's too much room in front of me in the ronda because the couple before me have taken great strides, catch up by moving more linearly but NOT with giant steps.

Leaving the lady time to do a "proper" elegant ocho cortado closing instead of forcing here to finish it. Gentle, gentle...
I encourage you in the direction you are exploring.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#82
New "working on it"s:

Leading with (almost) zero arm pressure of the lady's back, especially in very close embrace (I can pull it off in open embrace but somehow I have a tendency to hold the follower more firmly in a close embrace. Less is more.)

Doing (even) smaller steps. Even when there's too much room in front of me in the ronda because the couple before me have taken great strides, catch up by moving more linearly but NOT with giant steps.

Leaving the lady time to do a "proper" elegant ocho cortado closing instead of forcing here to finish it. Gentle, gentle...
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sixela

Well-Known Member
#83
It's not that I can't dance in a small space. It's that when other couples shoot off and leave lots of space I should know better than to take large steps in order to close the gap.
 
#84
Forwards ochos.

I'm discovering that the shape of the ochos vary quite a lot depending on what the leader does (i.e. rotate or sidestep). Which, yes, in hindsight is a statement of the bleedin' obvious, but I'm a slow learner.
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
#85
Forwards ochos.

I'm discovering that the shape of the ochos vary quite a lot depending on what the leader does (i.e. rotate or sidestep). Which, yes, in hindsight is a statement of the bleedin' obvious, but I'm a slow learner.
My favorite part of tango is discovering how many different ways there are to do the most basic steps.
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#86
Planeos on my left foot. Frequently they bring tears in my eyes. Perhaps you remember, that I had an injury with my left knee last year. Still the knee and the musculature isn´t resilient. Still I stagger and lurch. Am so frustrated.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#87
Forwards ochos.

I'm discovering that the shape of the ochos vary quite a lot depending on what the leader does (i.e. rotate or sidestep). Which, yes, in hindsight is a statement of the bleedin' obvious, but I'm a slow learner.
:D

but the "I'm discovering " bit is really important. how to teach autodidactism....
exploration and invention..
 

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
#90
Pondering changes in the distance of the embrace and how to make them smooth and musical. Close to open is always a bit jarring. I have no issues with creating clever ways to go back to close.

My teacher told me to try playing with distance during rotational steps and the turn. We'll see how that works.
 

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
#94
In other news, I am dancing toe-first again for most steps. Feels good now, my teacher says it is more gentle. I think I had to do heel first for a few years to understand my balance and stride; now I feel more like I can play with it.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#96
No way... not with all those vowels in the name!

Although I suppose Dai Dactic could be a transliteration of Llangllactc
at a tangent, or maybe a flight of fantasy;





the Welsh School of Tango disbanded after one of its moves the Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch* a long sequence of steps, was never by mastered by anyone excpet Dai the Dactic himself.

The Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch roughly translates into: "Entrada with a quebrada, followed by two very fast back ochos, with enrosques, arrastre, cruzada, traspie to left, and all done wearing a red dress" and often resulted into bumping into a wall..



[size=-4]*The name means: [St] Mary's Church (Llanfair) [in] the hollow (pwll) of the white hazel (gwyngyll) near (goger) the rapid whirlpool (y chwyrndrobwll) [and] the church of [St] Tysilio (llantysilio) with a red cave ([a]g ogo goch).[/size]
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
#97
the Welsh School of Tango disbanded after one of its moves the Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch* a long sequence of steps, was never by mastered by anyone excpet Dai the Dactic himself.

The Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch roughly translates into: "Entrada with a quebrada, followed by two very fast back ochos, with enrosques, arrastre, cruzada, traspie to left, and all done wearing a red dress" and often resulted into bumping into a wall..

[SIZE=-4]*The name means: [St] Mary's Church (Llanfair) [in] the hollow (pwll) of the white hazel (gwyngyll) near (goger) the rapid whirlpool (y chwyrndrobwll) [and] the church of [St] Tysilio (llantysilio) with a red cave ([a]g ogo goch).[/SIZE]
Isn't that near to a rainbow?
 

Zoopsia59

Well-Known Member
#99
The Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch roughly translates into: "Entrada with a quebrada, followed by two very fast back ochos, with enrosques, arrastre, cruzada, traspie to left, and all done wearing a red dress" and often resulted into bumping into a wall..
Well if the person who isn't leading is supposed to wear the red dress while not leading the non-follower, I'm not surprised that it was never mastered...
 
What I'm working on

Always keeping my axis, always, always, always. Except if the move takes you elsewhere of course ;) .

I want to be the strongest most independent follower completely absorbed in the connection with my partner.

Gotta love tango :notworth:
 

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