What are you working on?

UKDancer

Well-Known Member
Still struggling leading a giro while dancing an enrosque and lapiz, finishing with a parada. Anyone who can do it makes it look so easy, and I'm finding the balance (and maintaining my torso rotation) so hard ...
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
Still struggling leading a giro while dancing an enrosque and lapiz, finishing with a parada. Anyone who can do it makes it look so easy, and I'm finding the balance (and maintaining my torso rotation) so hard ...

My too, compagñero, and I´m already dancing for a long time. My answer is: we make our hobby what actually is the greatest challenge for us. My problem actually is balance: so I started to tango and to climb.

By the way: to correct your problem with the giro, you have to correct your head action, and your hip position: But easier written than done.
 

UKDancer

Well-Known Member
My too, compagñero, and I´m already dancing for a long time. My answer is: we make our hobby what actually is the greatest challenge for us. My problem actually is balance: so I started to tango and to climb.
Of course, you can cheat! Assuming a turn to the left, if the leader starts the turn stepping outside on RF (leading follower back, then side ... ), he can just twist (pivot slowly) on the RF, until the LF has collected in front (like a slow spiral action), and then launch the lapiz with the LF as the follower starts a back step - but I want to be able to dance that 'slick' enrosque - wah!
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
By the way I find it harder with a planeo than with an enrosques. Meanwhile I can do it easily with rulos. And try to do the enrosques in slow motion and then let yourself haul off by the follower? You can decide then when to do the lapiz.
 
I think the trick for doing that combination is to get comfortable doing each of the elements separately. When I first started trying them, I'd typically go through a frenzied rush trying to twist, swing my leg out then stop. When I slowed down and figured how to do each of them individually, it all came together. The easiest way for me is to start with a forward sacada on the follower's forward step, do an enrosque, start the lapiz on her back step and then pivot a little bit more and do the parada. Obviously, this took me 2+ years to get.
 
Once again, I am so so glad for my first teacher, and the way he taught me. This, for me, was Day 1, Lesson 1. I didn't know squat about AT, but he started with staying in front of him and staying focused on him...don't change, stay put.

(Don'cha love it when you realize...yet again...how awesome something was? When you realize, again, that something you took for granted was so much more valuable than you initially realized.)
I was not so lucky and it took me couple of years to come to the conclusion that

"As a follower, it is your job to stay in front of the leader and maintain the established relationship between your torsos unless specifically led not to."
To which I would add

And when the leader is moving, place your free foot, on the beat, wherever it needs to be to keep the connection
 

Zoopsia59

Well-Known Member
And when the leader is moving, place your free foot, on the beat, wherever it needs to be to keep the connection
Well, when the leader isn't moving, staying in front of him isn't that hard. So your add is implied by the rule to 'do what you have to do to stay in front of him' (except the "do it on the beat" part) :D
 
Well, when the leader isn't moving, staying in front of him isn't that hard. So your add is implied by the rule to 'do what you have to do to stay in front of him' (except the "do it on the beat" part) :D
Agreed.
But I think the 'free foot' bit is also important, because it is possible to stay with the leader, step with the music in the direction he is taking you, - but, by doing quick change of weight, step with the foot most comfortable for you, not the one he expects you to move. Infuriating, if done on a regular basis.

Not arguing, just trying to formulate for myself a concise rule which covers every situation. :D
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
...just trying to formulate for myself a concise rule which covers every situation. :D
I don't think rules like that exist, unless they are so vague as to be meaningless.

My first teacher often said, "There are no rules in tango".

The rule is: follow the rules except for when you shouldn't.
 

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
Milonga! Leading ahead of the current step. Trusting the follower to do her part and not to micromanage her. I can pull of some fancy milonga steps now that I never could do before. Gotta use them sparingly though, simple and rhythmic is good.

Also, in tango learned a new enrosque that leads into a back sacada. Good for a playful song.
 

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