What justifies the high spending cost for learning to dance to you?

Purr

Well-Known Member
#41
That's so cute. I'm sorry you have to wear revealing clothes in order to get asked to dance. Unfortunately, men are visual creatures.
I wouldn't say the dress is revealing. It's a Ralph Lauren navy and cream abstract print short dress, with a flattering cut that flows away from me. The outfit's complete with navy tights and pearl and crystal accessories.

No one's seeing anything they shouldn't, except maybe a lot of leg. But since my legs are one of my best features, and I'm wearing tights, I'm ok with that.
 

Loki

Well-Known Member
#42
So far this month I've had one lesson and one group class, both the same day, and I haven't went to any socials. I don't go to socials Friday because I feel tired and guilty about going, so I've been hitting the gym instead. I don't go to socials Saturday because I don't like the crowd mix. This month, I've also passed on some good workshops, for no good reason. I've been down in the dumps about dancing, and I have no idea how to get out of it.
Sounds like you're in the dance doldrums. Not uncommon (well, at least I've been there a few times ;)).

When that happens to me in other hobbies, I switch from the "boring" hobby to something else. It's tougher though with dance because dance gets rusty pretty quickly if you quit practicing (as you know).

One data point - once when I was really in the doldrums, I forced myself to go to a social. But it was significantly different in that I adopted a real "I don't give a f..." attitude instead of thinking about technique, and frame etc. I danced just to dance, made no apologies for screw-ups and didn't try to "impress the judges". It was great. It was fun, it re-energized me and I started looking forward to my next lesson. YMMV.
 
#43
When it comes to spending wild amounts of money on anything, I think it is important to look at some of the outcomes.

1. Are the people that I receiving the money behaving responsibly and using it to help more people to dance? Or are they just pocketing the money, resulting in the shrinkage of the Dance community long term?

2. Are the people that are spending the money improving their health and well-being as a result of dancing? Or are they going to fancy hotels and restaurants and eating irresponsibly? Drinking too much? Gambling? Etc

Obviously, there can be differing opinions about people spending money the way they want to spend their money. But overall, I hope there is some thoughtfulness of the outcomes that result from the money being spent. In many cases, there’s a lot of good coming out of the money being spent on dancing. But that does not mean that there are not some areas where the dance community could be improved. It is good to be thoughtful how each of us can play a role.
 
#44
I wouldn't say the dress is revealing. It's a Ralph Lauren navy and cream abstract print short dress, with a flattering cut that flows away from me. The outfit's complete with navy tights and pearl and crystal accessories.

No one's seeing anything they shouldn't, except maybe a lot of leg. But since my legs are one of my best features, and I'm wearing tights, I'm ok with that.
Oh well tights are a totally different story. I can see it's a little bit revealing if it's a lot of bare leg but tights are totally fine. I actually prefer it when women wear tights under a skirt. It's super cute. It's what you can't see that leaves me more to the imagination :)
 
#45
In many cases, there’s a lot of good coming out of the money being spent on dancing. But that does not mean that there are not some areas where the dance community could be improved. It is good to be thoughtful how each of us can play a role.
I see it as my way of supporting the arts. Some people donate money to museums and things like that. I like and respect the instructors at my dance school and yah my payments to the dance school help pay their salary but their efforts at teaching is good for the students overall and keeps the community alive.

Before I started dancing, I was a borderline alcoholic. I blew easily the monthly amount I pay the dance school now going out to pubs and restaurants. I've stopped drinking by a large margin since which has done wonders for my health.
 
#48
Back to the OP's original question. I justify the high cost by doing the most I can to maximize the investment.
At my studio. The lessons are cheaper the larger the number you buy. I buy the largest package to get the lowest per lesson price available.

Also at my studio, many of the groups and the practice party is included if you take at least one private that week. In a typical week for me, I take enough groups and the attend the party that a single private lesson in the week nets to be $13.00 a week.

There are weeks where I can't attend the typical 3 groups and/or miss the party, or I take more than one private that blows this "net" pricing model, but ability to bundle is a big justifier for me.

I've done this long enough now that my "lament" is the opportunity cost of spending so much time at the studio versus doing other things all to "justify" the dance expense.
 

IndyLady

Well-Known Member
#50
In addition to what I posted previously, one of the other factors in my decision making now is the recognition that current opportunities may not always be on the table. "Seize the moment", if you will. There's no guarantee that the status quo (certain pros/instructors being available, my health and finances) will be the same in future years. I've seen enough people come and go over the years, as well as other changes, to realize that putting off things until the "right time" may mean they will never happen.
 

newbie

Well-Known Member
#53
With my partner we just signed for a $45-per-person group class of 90 minutes where only the level is stated (advanced), not the content, and the teacher is not announced either.
We signed up precidely because we found the ad so absurd., asking for a considerably high fee and offering potentially nothing in return.
 

newbie

Well-Known Member
#54
The workshop took place last Saturday and Sunday. We signed for the two days. Only to discover that the Sunday workshop was simply the clone/mirror/repetition of the Saturday one.
 

Purr

Well-Known Member
#55
I paid $25 for a 90 minute smooth workshop yesterday. The information wasn't new, the best way to describe it is broad refresher. It's all good. :)
 

SwingingAlong

Well-Known Member
#56
Lately I've been using the 'will this make me happy enough to make me feel good about spending this amount of $$?" as the threshold.
I like this. I still haven't been back to my previous pro for lessons on a regular basis. Even though my energy is slowly returning, I couldn't figure out why I didn't go back. Thanks FF - the idea of spending the $$ and time (4 hour bus trip, 2 hour lesson and 2 hour travel/flight home)..... nope, the lesson, and the goals I had that we never seemed to get closer to..... just don't do it anymore. I have shifted the focus to having a lesson at that studio if I am in the city for other reasons.... and having lessons when I visit my family in another place. I'm usually ther for a couple weeks, rather than a day. It is quite a different vibe, and lots of fun, as I can ask for random things - last time I had a run through the studio's Gold routines for waltz, tango and quickstep. Next time, maybe SF and a bit of VW, and maybe even some basics on Latin, some social dancing, go out for tea with them, have a chat, join in some group classes, it's nice. So, then I am happy, and happy to spend as much as I can ($$ and time) while I'm there. A bit sad I'm not there long enough to do a comp, since they do ProAm....... but I'm not going to wish hard for that, since last time I was wishing to spend more time there was when my sister got really sick and she is OK at the moment:inlove:
 
#57
My idea of expensive is probably a little skewed since New York is pretty pricey all around (it also helps that my current studio is half the price of my first one), but as long as I'm coming away smiling after every lesson I'm more than willing to pay for them. I'm good at saying no to things I don't want to do, so I've never really had issues with being pushed into buying lessons or paying for socials I don't want to go to.

If anything dance has helped me get my spending in control all around. I always tend to save better when I have a goal in mind and being forced to budget for lessons while also continuing to save per usual really makes me think about how badly I want something before pulling the trigger.
 

IndyLady

Well-Known Member
#59
as long as I'm coming away smiling after every lesson I'm more than willing to pay for them.
This is key for me. On the flip side, when I realize I am dreading something and I come away either vaguely unhappy or relieved it's over, it's time to stop spending the money. I'm in a situation like that right now. I just need to make it across the next goal line (not too far out) and we're done.

"You should do a showcase."
"No."
"Why not?"
"It doesn't fit my value equation."
End of discussion.
I usually say "It's not in my budget" - which tends to shut things down quickly, no one likes to talk about money if we're not behind closed doors - but I particularly like your phrasing. Except I'd probably have to explain what that meant, and be back to "not in my budget", lol.
 

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