What type of dress do you buy for the level of dance that you are competing in?

#1
So, ok, how do I know what type of dress to buy for the level of dance that I will be competing in? I have two really beautiful competition dresses that I am still considering buying, but I don't know if I need them to start off with. I mean I don't want to overdo anything. And from what I know from my instructor is that I'll be dancing Country Western Bronze, but it's really my first competition etc. So, I don't want to spend so much on a dress if all I need let's say is a practice dress? And I've looked at most of the threads about dresses, but none have really talked about this issue. Plus it's like I don't want to spend a fortune on a dress that I'm only going to wear maybe like once. So, what do you all suggest? Thanks in advnce! :p
 

kayak

Active Member
#3
The group of pros around me have outfits for loan/rent/sell cheap to those getting started with them. A pros dress from several years back might just be perfect. You might ask?
 

skwiggy

Well-Known Member
#4
Perhaps you should ask your instructor if there are any costume rules or restrictions for your division, before you go and buy something that might violate those rules.
 
#5
Perhaps you should ask your instructor if there are any costume rules or restrictions for your division, before you go and buy something that might violate those rules.
See, that is exactly what I was afraid of. Plus last time he said absolutely not to a dress that I thought was perfect. But he's been doing this over twenty years now, so he should know. And that dress was meant for competition. Now, the one dress he already approved of for competition, because he said that's perfect for competition lol. But I was like are you sure that's not too much for what I'm going into right now lol? I guess for me it's so hard to judge without knowing what other people wear to these events you know? I mean I've seen just about every type of costume from pictures he has around the studio, but they were all different levels. That's why again, I don't want to buy something that I shouldn't be wearing at this time. Later perhaps, but not right now.
 

skwiggy

Well-Known Member
#6
That's why you should ask him for some kind of criteria, or examples or something. Sounds like your instructor will know best. But ask him for guidance before you waste your time looking for things he is likely to veto. Or, ask a female instructor at your studio.
 
#7
That's why you should ask him for some kind of criteria, or examples or something. Sounds like your instructor will know best. But ask him for guidance before you waste your time looking for things he is likely to veto. Or, ask a female instructor at your studio.
Yeah, it's hard though like you know when you see stuff on the Internet you want to buy, but is it really worth it if you can't wear the stuff lol. ;)
 
#10
My sister used to compete in CW and, in her first comps, there were very restrictive rules about what kind of dress and an absolute ban on rhinestones. She and her friends called their costumes for that level their "Amish dresses."
 
#11
My sister used to compete in CW and, in her first comps, there were very restrictive rules about what kind of dress and an absolute ban on rhinestones. She and her friends called their costumes for that level their "Amish dresses."
Oh now that's interesting. Maybe I have to go with like an all black dress or something like that until I hit the later categories of dance. I do know that the instructors can wear rhinestones, and some of the higher level of dancers can too. I guess I'm really going to have to find out now. All I know is that my boots will work lol. I guess that's a good start, because at least my feet can get used to my boots! ;)
 
#12
All I know about CW comps is what I've heard from my sister over the years. The costume rules may vary depending on who's running the comp, as it does in ballroom. If the comp has a website, it might have a page of rules that specifies what costumes are required.

But she couldn't just wear a regular dress--it had to have a yoke somewhere on it and I think had to be a non-shiny fabric. That almost requires having a costume specially made (which, come to think of it, is tougher than ballroom, where you can wear a regular dress in newcomer). She had one of those covertible dresses made, with a long skirt and a short skirt for the various dances.

If you need something that specific, let me know. She might want to sell or rent it.

Hopefully, someone will come along whose information is based on more than sisterly chit-chat.
 
#13
All I know about CW comps is what I've heard from my sister over the years. The costume rules may vary depending on who's running the comp, as it does in ballroom. If the comp has a website, it might have a page of rules that specifies what costumes are required.

But she couldn't just wear a regular dress--it had to have a yoke somewhere on it and I think had to be a non-shiny fabric. That almost requires having a costume specially made (which, come to think of it, is tougher than ballroom, where you can wear a regular dress in newcomer). She had one of those covertible dresses made, with a long skirt and a short skirt for the various dances.

If you need something that specific, let me know. She might want to sell or rent it.

Hopefully, someone will come along whose information is based on more than sisterly chit-chat.
If you don't mind me asking, what is a yoke? Also, if that is the case, then I might have to contact you by pm and not worry about the other dresses. But I'll see my instructor tonight, and I'll ask him for sure before I buy anything else. The stuff that I have bought right now is for showcase only. The other two I'm dreading to buy until I have a firm answer from someone. ;)
 

Vince A

Active Member
#14
SPratt,
A yoke is like a line that separates the upper level of a top from the lower level . . . a sewn in hem, stones, two different fabrics with a definitive separation, etc. Like seeing the back of a man's (and ladies) C&W shirt, where a seam from shoulder-to-shoulder and having a sort-of V shape in the middle.

Pardon my ignorance, but I have danced in three C&W venues, and none of those were titled with the word "Bronze." So, is this like "Newcomer?" What dance venues are you going to be dancing in?

If it is, be careful, as someone else said . . . no fancy glitter or rhinestones, etc. In fact, it should be, without a doubt, right off the rack.

Get on the UCWDC website . . . the rules and what you should use as a costume is well explained.
 
#15
SPratt,
A yoke is like a line that separates the upper level of a top from the lower level . . . a sewn in hem, stones, two different fabrics with a definitive separation, etc. Like seeing the back of a man's (and ladies) C&W shirt, where a seam from shoulder-to-shoulder and having a sort-of V shape in the middle.
Oh that's what a yoke is? I never knew that had a term for it lol. Wow! Ok, thanks for the information! ;)

Pardon my ignorance, but I have danced in three C&W venues, and none of those were titled with the word "Bronze." So, is this like "Newcomer?" What dance venues are you going to be dancing in?
Well, the one that I was referring to I think that Bronze was 30+ something (I'm not sure about that like I had said), and yes I would check the Newcomer category.

If it is, be careful, as someone else said . . . no fancy glitter or rhinestones, etc. In fact, it should be, without a doubt, right off the rack.

Get on the UCWDC website . . . the rules and what you should use as a costume is well explained.
Ok. I'll definitely ask about the rules about the dresses. I had no clue until tonight. Do you mean places of competition when you say venues? :D
 

Vince A

Active Member
#17
Well, the one that I was referring to I think that Bronze was 30+ something (I'm not sure about that like I had said), and yes I would check the Newcomer category.
Usually, it's:
Open - 18+
Crystal - 30+ so, you would be a Crystal Newcomer
Diamond - 40+
Silver - 50+
Gold - 60+
Platinum - 70+

Ok. I'll definitely ask about the rules about the dresses. I had no clue until tonight. Do you mean places of competition when you say venues? :D
Well, yes, and I guess to keep it simple . . . who is running things? Like UCWDC, CWDI, etc.
 
#18
Usually, it's:
Open - 18+
Crystal - 30+ so, you would be a Crystal Newcomer
Diamond - 40+
Silver - 50+
Gold - 60+
Platinum - 70+
I wonder why I thought Bronze lol? Thanks for breaking down the categories. I'm still learning this stuff.

Well, yes, and I guess to keep it simple . . . who is running things? Like UCWDC, CWDI, etc.
Oh that I don't know. I've only seen one flyer etc., but I haven't looked at them that closely to know who is running things. But I'll definitely let you know the next time they post where we are going for competition! ;)
 
#19
Can you rent a dress? I'm new to dancing, so this may be a big faux pas...if so, someone please tell me :confused:
You can absolutely rent a dress, and this is one way (which I recommend highly) to get a really quality dress at a reasonable cost, if you don't compete very often. Renting a dress will cost you about $140-175. Check out rhythmicrentals. I think the owner is a fellow DFer, also. Nice lady and very helpful and knowledgeable.
 
#20
Bronze in C&W is an age division--I think it's 40+ in ACDA, (30+ is Copper) which is who runs the event in Houston you are going to, SPratt. I think they do still require a yoke, and a "country" look to the costume, though UCWDC doesn't--but UC is more restrictive on the stoning at the newcomer level (I think.) You should be able to get plenty of information at the studio about costumes, etc. Your instructor is very experienced and there are several C&W competitors there.
 

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