Which is it -- social or salon for exhibition?

#21
I agree with some others about the occasion - a workshop summary for Gavito and Miller.

I was surprised about Gavito using the Tete-style right arm. In what situations is he using it?
 

tangobro

Active Member
#22
...Afros are NOT conducive to close embrace!.
?????

close embrace is my default style. I don't mind Afro hair styles, nor do my partners.

as for Susanna Miller "doing what is taught in classes" Susanna Miller was the source for much of the close embrace style of instruction, which she called "Milonguero Style" to distinguish it from the stage style which was being taught outside of Argentina.

To the o.p. - This seems to me to be a review of workshop elements. In a workshop here in New York she stressed the importance of dancing differently to different orchestras. She taught that Pugliese, for example, should be danced differently from D'Arienzo, the music should inspire the movement.

To those that noticed that a "Milonguero Style" instructor does not adhere to a strictly parallel all the time embrace, yes I noticed that also in classes with Susanna, Tete, & others
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#24
..In a workshop here in New York she stressed the importance of dancing differently to different orchestras. She taught that Pugliese, for example, should be danced differently from D'Arienzo..
That goes without saying.

..I was surprised about Gavito using the Tete-style right arm..
Alarm: only ever came across his left-arm-style (I mean the bad habit of leaving hold and let it simply go)...
 

jantango

Active Member
#25
If both videos are for the students of a class, shouldn't they at least show how to dance in a milonga? What about all those pregnant pauses?

Tete, like Gavito, often put his right hand on his partner's shoulder. Tete was also famous for letting go of partners with both arms so he could fly.
 
#26
Tete is mostly keeping his right arm elbow and fingers pointing downward, near/on follower shoulder as well as doing his aeroplane. It really is his style!

Gavito opens up the hold often and that is easy to find but keeping the elbow/fingertips down and the hand near follower's shoulder can't be his main style so I wonder in which situations he did use it?
 

sixela

Well-Known Member
#27
What about all those pregnant pauses?
I don't mind pregnant pauses (in fact, I'm just learning to appreciate them myself) but they have to fit the music. Here, they didn't, which is what makes me think that the dancers were illustrating a point in class rather than, well, dancing.
 

jantango

Active Member
#31
And those who perform on stage can't dance appropriately for a milonga?


Daniel Binelli talks about the music inspiring a couple to dance and the intimacy they share for three minutes. He plays while they demonstrate their styles for Pugliese, D'Arienzo, etc.

This is NOT social dancing; it is their choreography for a demo. Why isn't their style appropriate for the dance floor? There are many reasons.

This is what too many are being sold as social tango when it's really for exhibition or stage.
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#32
Agreed. And what Binelli demonstrated also was much more elaborated than those hurried jerks the dance couple only could contribute.

This is what too many are being sold as social tango when it's really for exhibition or stage.
On the other hand, do you really want to deny Binelli the fee?
 

Lui

Active Member
#33
Leaving the quality of the dance or musical interpretation aside, I’m not sure if both clips want to show an example of social dancing.

While Binelli’s final remark on the three minutes hints in that direction, he mainly speaks of certain ways to find suitable choreographies to the specific music mixing both worlds of dancing. I don’t think that this clip was aimed a social dancers, but more a general audience who don’t know or care about social dancing. Therefore, it looks as if the producer thought,“Let’s make it obvious and bold, we need stage steps. Oh and the budget, better keep it cheap: we hire young ones, 5 minutes of preparation at the set have to be enough” – so they did.


Summaries, on the other hand, are neither fish nor fowl, as the lack the glamorous spectacle of a show and don’t have the intimate setting of a real Milonga. Sometimes the dance is more a situation like this:
“Two workshops down one more to go. Hopefully I remember everything we’ve taught, or they complain. I forgot, at least one. Keep calm and think. Think harder, but don’t let your face show it. You don’t want to look grumpy, never look grumpy on the internet. Good heavens, I remember! Dang, now all suitable moments in the music have past! Is there one more? I’m not sure! 20 seconds left, the next students are already at the door - It’s now or never. Throw the move in and get done with it!”
In this way, summaries are a good service to provide a memory-aid, but not always just the pinnacle of social dancing.
 

sixela

Well-Known Member
#35
This is NOT social dancing; it is their choreography for a demo.
Argumentation by assertion?

I don't think it is a demo, and the quantity of people in the audience also doesn't make sense for a demo (unless it's "a demonstration of a point made in classes", which was my point made several times).

It seems somehow you have an axe to grind, and a big one.

One shivers at the thought of someone you don't like demonstrating something that _shouldn't_ be done (for all we know, she could even have been demonstrating how dancing with in a way that fits music A doesn't fit music B!) and for you to obtain video of it.
 

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