Which is which - Cortes y Quebradas

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#1
Dear Forum,

Cortes and Quebradas do actually not belong to my repertoir. But nevertheless I want to distinguish them from other stuff.
So, can you help me to indentify which is which in the following vid ?

Thx in advance - OD

[YT]VbIn-GT9w1U[/YT]
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#2
"....

Cortes y quebradas are choreographic figures of tango, they were executed in
Candombe by blacks and remained in the early forms of tango such as
canyengue. They were later removed because it was thought that they were not
elegant or that they could even be somewhat obscene.

The original tango as it was danced by people still alive such as Carmen
Calderon (close to 100 years of age and still dancing) was done with Cortes,
Quebradas and Sentadas.

Corte means 'cut'. It is a sudden stop. The dancer does 'una corrida' - (a
run) - and suddenly puts partial weight on one leg but returns immediately
to the other or else he changes direction suddenly.

Quebrada means to 'break' - it refers to bend at the waist level either to
the sides or to the front or back.

Sentadas mean 'seat' - it refers to the man allowing the lady to seat on his
legs or at times raising her to his waist level, they are still done."

from Tango-L forum

http://www.virtuar.com/tango/articles/2006/quebrada.htm
 

jantango

Active Member
#4
I pity the dancers who follow this trend and then later in life have back pain and wonder why. That was another example of how teachers are coming up with unusual stuff and then calling it tango. There is nothing elegant about it. They have no embrace. I don't care what the movements are called, it's not tango in my opinion.

If I were to take a guess from the still in the YouTube frame, I would say they are dancing Polka, the style I learned in the Polish community in Chicago.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#5
Huh. Kinda cool. Don't like it to traditional music, I don't think, and would like it more as accents instead of the main style...but pretty cool. (To be fair, it seems that it was a post-workshop sort of demonstration, so of course they were going to be throwing that in everywhere.)

Actually, the bending at the waist thing was done in another recent video posted--the "I'm Yours" nuevo clip. There's a point where she lets her back bend sort of like that (at 2:37/2:38), and I think it was done very nicely. The more I look at it and think about it, those sorts of movements do crop up from time to time as accents, so it would seem it's made the transition into tango pretty well.

There's no reason why any of that should hurt someone's back, unless they have preexisting back problems or it's not done correctly...
 
#6
Cortes and Quebradas

Dear Forum,

Cortes and Quebradas do actually not belong to my repertoir. But nevertheless I want to distinguish them from other stuff.
So, can you help me to indentify which is which in the following vid ?

Thx in advance - OD

[YT]VbIn-GT9w1U[/YT]
I’m with Jan on this one. The only thing that resembles tango in this video is the music If you want to see Cortes find a video with someone dancing tango.
 
#8
I tried, but did not find anything. The one I posted is the only example. So, do you have an idea, what is shown?
Cortes y quebradas are generic names in reference to any tango or milonga
choreographic figure or dancing movement.

This is the modern meaning of those words. So tango with cortes is one
danced with firuletes or embellishments such as ganchos, amagues, boleos,
barridas, enrosques, planeos, etc. and those elements are generically called
"cortes".

Tango sin cortes is one danced in a simple manner, mostly walking with some
simple turns, and perhaps front and back ochos. Similar to tango liso.

These words originally meant a specific move . Corte: a sudden pause in the
middle of a run while dancing .

Quebrada a bending at the waist in any direction while dancing.

Those two terms in time became generic meaning any tango or milonga
embellishment.

Since the original tango "firuletes" could on occasion have an obscene
component it was the rule in social dances to prohibit dancing with cortes y
quebradas.

Cortes were invented by individual dancers and passed from generation to
generation.

The word "corte" has other meaning in Argentine slang as well by they are
not related to tango.

Here is a photo of Quebrada position done by Pablo Veron ( Verón) and Gisela Graf Merino dancing to "Quejas de bandoneon" by Juan de Dios Filiberto in "Fous des Folies", directed by Alfredo Arias, Paris, 1993.

http://www.dance-forums.com/album/t...0bb4b5e043c5864be7f1cee&w=1024&h=768&zc=0&q=0


I found he video from 1993 he does a corte in the second half of the video wearing a striped suit.
http://premiumwanadoo.com/mephisto-tango/videos-pabloveron09.html
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#9
Cortes y quebradas

.. Cortes y quebradas are generic names in ref... So tango with cortes is one danced with firuletes or embellishments such as ganchos, amagues, boleos, barridas, enrosques, planeos, etc. and those elements are generically called "cortes" ..
that may help a lot. Seems that there is a narrow and wider sence of the word.

Here is a photo .. done by Pablo Veron .. and Gisela ..
Dancing and knowing this stuff seem to be different things: I found this photo too and asked Gisela (she visites Hamburg once a year). Her answer roughly: thats kind of a pose final ?

I found this video from 1993 he does a corte in the second half
thanks a lot for the link. I am after it for a long time !! Thanks for the informations, too.
OD
 
#10
In my extremely modest newcomer's opinion, one doesn't need to dig that deep. Cortes are relatively popular nowadays. Gustavo Naveira seems to love them in particular. Apparently that thing wouldn't let me post youtube links as a newcomer, so I'll be descriptive. Check out, for example, his performance on "El adios" by Donato in San Francisco last year.
As for quebradas, these are slightly more exotic indeed, but can be seen in many videos by Horacio Godoy and Cecilia Garcia. A nice one to check would be the performance on "Portena linda" at the Brussels tango festival from this year.
And yes, I definitely agree that the video in the beginning of this thread is not so great, to put it mildly...

By the way does anyone know how long one should dwell around in order to be able to post links?
 

Steve Pastor

Moderator
Staff member
#11
First, if no one has said it yet, welcome to DF, borisvain13.

I've been on vacation for a week, and away from my main resources.

When I got home today, I picked up Robert Thmpson's book, again. I think it was there that I saw that candombe is popular in Germany. So I think this is where opendoor's questions/comments are coming from. No?

I may have posted this once before in another thread.

Distinctive elements added from the African Argentine [[candombe]] were ''quebradas'', improvised, jerky, semi-athletic contortions, the more dramatic the better, and ''cortes'', a suggestive pause, or sudden break in the figures of the dance. Unlike in the then "Tango" of that group, however, where these movements were danced apart, they were now danced together. <ref>Tango! The Dance, the Song, the Story. Collier, Cooper, Azzi and Martin. 1995. Thames and Hudson, Ltd. pages 46, 47. ISBN 0-500-01671-2.</ref>

This Africanized milonga-tango, as well as the habanera and mazurka, was frowned upon, and found wholly unacceptable by some sections of Argentine high society.<ref>Tango! The Dance, the Song, the Story. Collier, Cooper, Azzi and Martin. 1995. Thames and Hudson, Ltd. pages 45. ISBN 0-500-01671-2.</ref>

Farris lists the corte as a sudden swift stop or quick pose: also called parada, as being part of the lexicon of tango as the twentieth century started. (page 229) This was a carry over of the same "step"/"move" (or non move!) in milonga and earlier still, canyengue.

I have found that Americans, as an example, aren't very aware of their own history, including music and dance. (I will spare you several examples.)

I've been meaning to ask Jantango to comment on the situation in Buenos Aires, regarding knowledge of the full history of tango, and now is the perfect time. I would guess that, with the consistent empaphsis on how AT is is danced there now, the same is true in Argentina.
 

opendoor

Well-Known Member
#12
Hallo here borisvian13 in DF!

.. popular nowadays. Gustavo Naveira seems to love them in particular ..
And that would mean, that alterations and direction changes are cortes, too?

..saw that candombe is popular in Germany...
My first teacher was an uruguayan and all his family played around carnival in a candombe - murga - milonga (w-e-i-m-b) drum band. So I got weened to this aspect of tango from the very first moment on. Secondly, my TA credo is, to be open for all styles. I hate it, when the music separates the groups and generations. And so I am interested in the historic styles, as well.

Farris lists the corte as a sudden swift stop or quick pose: also called parada .. (page 229). This was a carry over of the same "step" ..
OK, that fits together with hbBoogie1 view of a wider sense of meaning.

Thanks all together for the suggestions
 
#14
OK, so let me be specific about the clips.
In the first video I posted - cortes at 0.25, 0.48, 1.42 (of course all these correspond to syncopes which mark the end of a phrase in the music)
In the the second - quebradas at 0.28-0.35 and 1.03; a corte at 0.48.

I'm sorry, I still haven't figured out how to use quotes (the option "quote message in reply doesn't seem active for some reason), so I'll proceed like this.

To opendoor: No, what I mean by corte is quite specific: a sudden freeze, a step cut in middle. So yeah, in that sense corte is a particular kind of pause (parada).

To Steve Pastor: Many thanks. I've been reading this forum for awhile. I recently read Robert Farris Thompson's book based on your recommendation and I definitely don't regret it. Quite intriguing stuff.
 

jantango

Active Member
#15
I've been meaning to ask Jantango to comment on the situation in Buenos Aires, regarding knowledge of the full history of tango, and now is the perfect time. I would guess that, with the consistent empaphsis on how AT is is danced there now, the same is true in Argentina.

Frankly, in my contact with dancers in the milongas, there is no time to ask them about their knowledge of tango's history. However, I have had the opportunity to listen to the personal history of several milongueros who enjoy talking about how they learned tango and where they went to dance, etc.

Tango as a dance has been evolving since the 1930s, and it will continue to evolve. I'd say that's one reason why certain movements are no longer part of social dancing.
 

Steve Pastor

Moderator
Staff member
#16
Seems like a good spot to put this bit I ran across yesterday.
These are excerpts from a longer post that can be found here.
http://www.virtuar.com/tango/articles/2006/quebrada.htm
I see some material there that I haven't seen before.

"There are many written accounts of what the (for lack of a better term) "pre-purification" tango looked like."

"In the beginning there were two types of tango with a gray area separating the two. The "real" tango was obscene, wild, full of lust and bravado. The same adjectives can be used to describe its practitioners."

Anyone familiar with Ruddy Zelaya? Igor Polk is well known to me.
 

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