Why do people give up salsa?

Sagitta

Well-Known Member
#41
There are those who come to dance and dance for the dance, with no hang-ups. There are others who do have issues. It may be because you are too tall, too short, fat, too skinny, of a particular race, of a particular skill level. I find, as tj said, that by focusing on the positives and seeking what I want I get a lot more out of dancing than others.
 

tsb

Well-Known Member
#42
borikensalsero said:
brujo said:
To be brutally honest, this whole salsa addiction crap is totally unhealthy. People in Cuba don't go out dancing every night. There is no bembe every evening. Ricans don't go to bars every single night of the week to dance. It would get boring. Can you imagine going out drinking and dancing every night?
I beg to differ, I lead this very lifestyle mocked upon, hence allowing me to say the very statement above shows much still to be gained to understand what the term “salsa addiction” means. It's like saying: to be a devout Christian is crap because going go to church 5 times a week at the crack of dawn is bull and unhealthy. ...Because it doesn't fit our thinking it means not crap, it simply means it is different.

That's addiction! One that doesn't stop me from my everyday living because it is my everyday living, it is part of my religious beliefs, it is part of my culture, it is part of my history, it is part of what makes me, this very person.

I just happen to verbalize and have the knowledge of a topic that many feel but can’t explain.
thanks for putting this out there - it helps me clarify a point i haven't been able to verbalize properly until now.

salsa is a definitely a religion to a lot of people, and some people pursue salsa with as much or more zeal than people pursuing any conventionally recognized faith. (i'm not knocking that - i think everyone has a 'god' of some sort in how that 'god' becomes what they rely on to help them deal with stress, even if it's their own intellect, etc.). but i would challenge them to consider the impact of the statements & sentiments they express if they were to put them into a context of talking about their religion & to consider how they might come across to "non-believers" - by their words & actions. my take is that a significant portion of the expressed thoughts & sentiments would be considered at the very least incredibly non-PC.
 

Sagitta

Well-Known Member
#43
When one finds something in the music/dance that connects to and reinforces important core beliefs that make you what you are one won't give it up.

I'm a Roman Catholic, but salsa has helped me grow more religious, more devout in my faith and beliefs. It is why I'll never give up the dance. It has a way of connecting to eternal truths. This has been also true for friends of mine who are atheists, spiritualists, or of other religions.
 
#44
Sagitta said:
There are those who come to dance and dance for the dance, with no hang-ups. There are others who do have issues. It may be because you are too tall, too short, fat, too skinny, of a particular race, of a particular skill level. I find, as tj said, that by focusing on the positives and seeking what I want I get a lot more out of dancing than others.
I HAVE listed and DO focus on the positive and I tried to make that come across. If I didn't focus on the positive, I would have left the salsa scene a long time ago.
The positive things that I covered in my post were:
-taking different salsa styling classes,
-learning on 2 and adding to on 1,
-going to a different city- NYC to dance (with friends),
-putting myself out there near those I want to dance with even though INITIALLY I'm shy. Later after I'm there in a club, I am in the zone.
-Continuing with my advanced class.
I know I'm a good dancer and am presentable or I wouldn't have been asked to perform and already realize that you have to make your own happiness. I don't come there with hang ups or issues. I come for fun. If someone doesn't want to dance with me for any particular reason, that's fine. They have a right to their preferences as I have a right to mine.

I haven't talked about this much before now but just thought if any place, this is a place I could be honest at especially after seeing how open and honest other people's posts are that I've read for all these weeks.
 

tsb

Well-Known Member
#45
Sagitta said:
When one finds something in the music/dance that connects to and reinforces important core beliefs that make you what you are one won't give it up.

I'm a Roman Catholic, but salsa has helped me grow more religious, more devout in my faith and beliefs. It is why I'll never give up the dance. It has a way of connecting to eternal truths. This has been also true for friends of mine who are atheists, spiritualists, or of other religions.
are you responding to my post? your response doesn't give me any sort of indication that you heard my point.
 

Sagitta

Well-Known Member
#46
tsb said:
Sagitta said:
When one finds something in the music/dance that connects to and reinforces important core beliefs that make you what you are one won't give it up.

I'm a Roman Catholic, but salsa has helped me grow more religious, more devout in my faith and beliefs. It is why I'll never give up the dance. It has a way of connecting to eternal truths. This has been also true for friends of mine who are atheists, spiritualists, or of other religions.
are you responding to my post? your response doesn't give me any sort of indication that you heard my point.
See my pm. I heard your point. If I choose to respond explicitly to a previous post I do try to include quotes in my response.
 
#47
Artsy I agree and I feel that this issue of racism is such a deep hurtful one that people should not give trite platitudes in response unless you have been in that position of having other people consider you somehow inferior because of your gender and skin color. Even then you should be careful because no matter how postive you are in life, both your perception and experience of reality will ALWAYS be colored by external forces and social norms.

It's ok to empathize (like tj did ;-0) but please don't minimize because it takes emotional courage to talk about and deal with things like this
 

tsb

Well-Known Member
#48
Sagitta said:
tsb said:
Sagitta said:
When one finds something in the music/dance that connects to and reinforces important core beliefs that make you what you are one won't give it up.

I'm a Roman Catholic, but salsa has helped me grow more religious, more devout in my faith and beliefs. It is why I'll never give up the dance. It has a way of connecting to eternal truths. This has been also true for friends of mine who are atheists, spiritualists, or of other religions.
are you responding to my post? your response doesn't give me any sort of indication that you heard my point.
See my pm. I heard your point. If I choose to respond explicitly to a previous post I do try to include quotes in my response.
got it! thanks! :)
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
#49
brujo said:
no no no no no

you guys have it all wrong. People give up salsa because there is more groping in Reggaeton
:lol: :lol: Snort!! Trust you to say that, brujo! (DF hasn't been the same without you. :lol: :lol: )
 
#51
africana said:
Artsy I agree and I feel that this issue of racism is such a deep hurtful one that people should not give trite platitudes in response unless you have been in that position of having other people consider you somehow inferior because of your gender and skin color. Even then you should be careful because no matter how postive you are in life, both your perception and experience of reality will ALWAYS be colored by external forces and social norms.

It's ok to empathize (like tj did ;-0) but please don't minimize because it takes emotional courage to talk about and deal with things like this
Excellent....So very well put, Africana. You don't know how much I thought about what I wrote and I tried to cover everything...the good and the bad.
I've resolved a long time ago that I am dancing at these venues sharing and nurturing the growth of other dancers who are kind and willing to share and nurture my growth as a dancer.
I'm glad you understand what I've said. :wink:
 

tj

New Member
#54
ArtsySalsera said:
Hmmmm...Is he a dancer? I haven't heard of him.
Yup, he's an instructor out in Asia. He used to teach out of Singapore - had a troupe that performed at a couple of the LA Congresses.

I think Salsachinita knows him.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
#56
ArtsySalsera said:
africana said:
Artsy I agree and I feel that this issue of racism is such a deep hurtful one that people should not give trite platitudes in response unless you have been in that position of having other people consider you somehow inferior because of your gender and skin color. Even then you should be careful because no matter how postive you are in life, both your perception and experience of reality will ALWAYS be colored by external forces and social norms.

It's ok to empathize (like tj did ;-0) but please don't minimize because it takes emotional courage to talk about and deal with things like this
Excellent....So very well put, Africana. You don't know how much I thought about what I wrote and I tried to cover everything...the good and the bad.
I've resolved a long time ago that I am dancing at these venues sharing and nurturing the growth of other dancers who are kind and willing to share and nurture my growth as a dancer.
I'm glad you understand what I've said. :wink:
Hmm. Had to think about this awhile before posting anything ... just because race can get to be so contentious, so easily. So, for me, it's one of those things. I talk about it all the time among friends, but on a forum is iffy.

But hey. What the heck. As an African-American female, I've sometimes felt apprehensive about dancing in certains scenes or at certain venues. A certain amount of caution is part of my learned self-defense mechanism, unfortunately.

Ballroom dance is unfriendly to everybody. :wink: :lol: Just kidding. You have to be there a while to become part of the crowd. In Country and Western (where I was most apprehensive of all,) race turned out to be a gigantic non-issue.

The salsa scenes I've experienced have been quite snobby/cliquish in spots, it's true. But, from my view, that's been at least as much about whether you can actually dance (LOL) and whether you're perceived as an insider or outsider. Once you get past that whole inside/outside thing, it's about whether you can dance. At least, that's what's I've seen. But I acknowledge that every scene is different. :? I hope race never becomes an issue that drives any of us away. Just find somebody positive to dance with, and keep on dancing. Yes? :wink: 8)

btw, africana, where in Africa are you from? Just curious. I have lots of family and friends in Ghana. 8)
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
#58
Since we're going off-topic, here, just figured I'd mention that Artsy Salsera has really cool emoticons. Dare I say it? Maybe even cooler than Sabor's! :shock: :lol:

Anybody care to get back on topic -- why people give up salsa, I think? :wink: :lol:
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
#60
Ah. Cool. Got a few friends there, or from there, too... and just found out that there's a Cameroonian lady in my new neighborhood, within walking distance. Pretty cool. She can hook me up with where to buy some hard-to-find foods.

*shakes head* What topic is this, again? Don't remember. But nice to me you. Glad you're here. :D
 

Dance Ads