"Yay Boy" -- what's it about?

#21
Here's is what one of the greatest New York Latin Musicians had to say:

Ya Boy = Ya Voy = I'll be right there

Ya Boy = Ya Vol = Yes Sir

Moyuba!

Moso ma, a muna yeye, muele muele, Chio nele pa leba dó,
um pantio manantio, Elebeb, Cofisa langa, caca chilanga,
Che che cofisa, a de de!

Personally I think it's a mix of very few Cuban Afro/Spanish mix and lots of MUMBO JUMBO lyrics.

Most santeria lyrics are just made up words. The african decendants lost most of the language while leaning spanish and spoke and new afro-spanish similar to a southern slave in the states who spoke an english dialect called gullah. Most composers who were not poets, nor knew the Bozal Spanish wrote songs in jibberish to mimmick the african language.

In the Caribbean they spoke Bozal Spanish copla . . .

Yo sabe señó Manué
ta jabrando ma de mí
que ta nomorá de ti
y tú le correspondé

Toro Nasaria yo sé
manque tú me tan negando,
por eso tan despresiando
mi corasó sinfelí

¡Ay! tibiri corona inguaco,
¡ay! tibiri, biri, que ne
¡ay! tibiri, que negro fua . . .
de branco que tan diablá.

Nasaria, mio chiquita,
la pena me ta muriendo,
y tú siempre ta riendo
sin cuedate tú de mi.

excerpt
unknown poet


Afro Antillian Spanish

ñáñigo: occult character
anana: pineapple, piña
bachata: fiesta, party
bámbula: danza negra - black dance
bambú: planta gramínea - plant (used in construction) bamboo
bochinche: pelea - fight
bomba: baile negroide - black style dance (Puerto Rico)
burundanga: mezcla informe de cosas heterogéneas, plato de comida - dish made with a mix of heterogeneous ingredients.
cafolé: cafe con leche - coffee with milk ( a slang word)
fufú: hechizo - spell
funche: plato a base de harina de maiz - corn meal based dish
gandinga: sopó a base de riñones, hígado y corazón de cerdo - a soup like dish made with pork liver, heart, kidneys and codiments.
congo: tambor - type of drum
grifería: pelo ensortijado - black hair
jungla: selva - jungle
malanga: tubérculo semejante a la yautía - edible root similar to the yautía
Mondongo: sopón de entrañas de cerdo y vegetales - soup made using pork stomack and vegetables
Pasa: mechón de pelo ensortijado - black hair
 
#23
msjanemas said:
Here's is what one of the greatest New York Latin Musicians had to say:

Ya Boy = Ya Voy = I'll be right there

Ya Boy = Ya Vol = Yes Sir

Moyuba!

Moso ma, a muna yeye, muele muele, Chio nele pa leba dó,
um pantio manantio, Elebeb, Cofisa langa, caca chilanga,
Che che cofisa, a de de!

Personally I think it's a mix of very few Cuban Afro/Spanish mix and lots of MUMBO JUMBO lyrics.

Most santeria lyrics are just made up words. The african decendants lost most of the language while leaning spanish and spoke and new afro-spanish similar to a southern slave in the states who spoke an english dialect called gullah. Most composers who were not poets, nor knew the Bozal Spanish wrote songs in jibberish to mimmick the african language.
I'm not sure which musician you consulted, but I think the post is off-base because all the research I have done so far indicates that "Yay Boy" is NOT a santeria song, nor was it composed in the Caribbean. People using sources from the African country of Senegal seem to be our best hope of finding an answer.
 
#24
Big10 said:
msjanemas said:
Here's is what one of the greatest New York Latin Musicians had to say:

Ya Boy = Ya Voy = I'll be right there

Ya Boy = Ya Vol = Yes Sir

Moyuba!

Moso ma, a muna yeye, muele muele, Chio nele pa leba dó,
um pantio manantio, Elebeb, Cofisa langa, caca chilanga,
Che che cofisa, a de de!

Personally I think it's a mix of very few Cuban Afro/Spanish mix and lots of MUMBO JUMBO lyrics.

Most santeria lyrics are just made up words. The african decendants lost most of the language while leaning spanish and spoke and new afro-spanish similar to a southern slave in the states who spoke an english dialect called gullah. Most composers who were not poets, nor knew the Bozal Spanish wrote songs in jibberish to mimmick the african language.
I'm not sure which musician you consulted, but I think the post is off-base because all the research I have done so far indicates that "Yay Boy" is NOT a santeria song, nor was it composed in the Caribbean. People using sources from the African country of Senegal seem to be our best hope of finding an answer.
I talkd to my friend again tonight about some of these postulations and translations...well he laughed at me, said it was absurd :shock: :lol: so I told to him to hurry up with getting the translation from his relative who speaks wolof (and he's curious as to why we are so curious about it cos incidentally, he does not like Africando :? )

so I'm waiting....
 
#25
on a somewhat unrelated note, can some1 tell me whether this song is best danced on1 or on2?

Seems like breaking on 2 is more natural to my ears, what do you think?
 

yola

New Member
#26
africana said:
Big10 said:
msjanemas said:
Here's is what one of the greatest New York Latin Musicians had to say:

Ya Boy = Ya Voy = I'll be right there

Ya Boy = Ya Vol = Yes Sir

Moyuba!

Moso ma, a muna yeye, muele muele, Chio nele pa leba dó,
um pantio manantio, Elebeb, Cofisa langa, caca chilanga,
Che che cofisa, a de de!

Personally I think it's a mix of very few Cuban Afro/Spanish mix and lots of MUMBO JUMBO lyrics.

Most santeria lyrics are just made up words. The african decendants lost most of the language while leaning spanish and spoke and new afro-spanish similar to a southern slave in the states who spoke an english dialect called gullah. Most composers who were not poets, nor knew the Bozal Spanish wrote songs in jibberish to mimmick the african language.
I'm not sure which musician you consulted, but I think the post is off-base because all the research I have done so far indicates that "Yay Boy" is NOT a santeria song, nor was it composed in the Caribbean. People using sources from the African country of Senegal seem to be our best hope of finding an answer.
I talkd to my friend again tonight about some of these postulations and translations...well he laughed at me, said it was absurd :shock: :lol: so I told to him to hurry up with getting the translation from his relative who speaks wolof (and he's curious as to why we are so curious about it cos incidentally, he does not like Africando :? )

so I'm waiting....
a friend of mine at the salsaschool i was teaching before, once told me he very much liked the song cox they were singing in his home language.
sadly i hardly see him anymore cos i don't go to that salsaschool anymore..
 
#27
Big10 said:
msjanemas said:
Here's is what one of the greatest New York Latin Musicians had to say:

Ya Boy = Ya Voy = I'll be right there

Ya Boy = Ya Vol = Yes Sir

Moyuba!

Moso ma, a muna yeye, muele muele, Chio nele pa leba dó,
um pantio manantio, Elebeb, Cofisa langa, caca chilanga,
Che che cofisa, a de de!

Personally I think it's a mix of very few Cuban Afro/Spanish mix and lots of MUMBO JUMBO lyrics.

Most santeria lyrics are just made up words. The african decendants lost most of the language while leaning spanish and spoke and new afro-spanish similar to a southern slave in the states who spoke an english dialect called gullah. Most composers who were not poets, nor knew the Bozal Spanish wrote songs in jibberish to mimmick the african language.
I'm not sure which musician you consulted, but I think the post is off-base because all the research I have done so far indicates that "Yay Boy" is NOT a santeria song, nor was it composed in the Caribbean. People using sources from the African country of Senegal seem to be our best hope of finding an answer.
Our best hope? Touch, touchy! Read my quote again:

Personally I think it's a mix of very few Cuban Afro/Spanish mix and lots of MUMBO JUMBO lyrics.

Most santeria lyrics are just made up words. The african decendants lost most of the language while leaning spanish and spoke and new afro-spanish similar to a southern slave in the states who spoke an english dialect called gullah. Most composers who were not poets nor knew the Bozal Spanish wrote songs in jibberish to mimmick the african language.
I think I should of used the word jibberish before the word mix on the first paragraph. Then you may have read it differently. What I did was give a little history on the afro language in the Caribbean (I thought it would be interesting to mention since the song was a tribute to Arragon's music, but I never said it was Bozal. In other words, I said Bozal was lost, so most compositions were jibberish words. I also said "Personally I think", not "He thought" above. All he did was provide his imput on a mix of jibberish having some meaning to those from the Caribbean like the words "Ya Boy = Ya Voy" which was previously used in many caribbean afro compostions. Now if you want to get technical Africando's song is called YAYE BOY. Is the song in Wolof? According to this articale it is:

Since the earlier 1990s a rotating ensemble of well-known African and Hispanic musicians have recorded together under the name Africando. Though their hit song "Yaye Boy" is in Wolof, a dozen or so singers from Cuba to New York have made their own versions.
But I think that article is bias. I never heard of a group calling themselves Africando other than the original one who continued to do so after Pape Seck died.

There is always a story to why any song was composed. All we know is that the song was a tribute to Arragon. Maybe I'll just ask Papo Pepin the Congero who records with them?

Oh and for your INFORMATION YAYO "EL" INDIO FROM PR DID THE COROS!
 
#28
pianoman said:
on a somewhat unrelated note, can some1 tell me whether this song is best danced on1 or on2?

Seems like breaking on 2 is more natural to my ears, what do you think?
Yes I think so too 8)
 
#29
nice thread!. Let's hope someone manages to find out!

msjanemas, why are you so sure that the lyrics are 'jibberish'? you seem pretty sure about it, and i'd like to know why, given that:
1. someone said that an old friend recognized it as his home language
2. two different posts made the connection with "dear mother"
3. africando is basically senegalese, so ... why mimic through jibberish languages that they actually speak?

Also, quite a lot of the Afro-Antillan words you cite are perfectly good spanish words, and others have meanings that change from place to place. I state this not to be nitpicky but to signal caution if someone is to use that as a translating guide.

Finally, i found a tiny wolof dictionary on the web, so little that is not helpful (specially without knowledge of the language!). But at least "yaay"=mother, "aa" ~ a silightly longer "a", as in "far", as balando_salsa pointed out (i also checked the others), he also said he believes that part of the song is in creole, in one of my searches a reviewer stated that one album by africando (dont remember which one) includes lyrics in eight (!) languages, one of those haitian creole
 
#30
I didn't say I was sure. I am sure of many Santeria songs being jibberish, except for the very early ones.

Seemed like no one "here" knew the language so I took a poke at what "I personally think" about it being possibly part jibberish. Why? Because there's a pattern in AfroCaribbean songs, Santeria or NOT Santeria, that are jibberish.

1. someone said that an old friend recognized it as his home language

If I recognized it as "my" home language I would of been able to translate for my friend on the spot!

3. africando is basically senegalese, so ... why mimic through jibberish languages that they actually speak?

Then it shouldn't take long to get it translated.

Also, quite a lot of the Afro-Antillan words you cite are perfectly good spanish words, and others have meanings that change from place to place. I state this not to be nitpicky but to signal caution if someone is to use that as a translating guide.

Yes some of it was "almost perfectly good Spanish" but if you notice some letters were dropped because of the heavy afro accent the slaves had, which means that they couldn't pronounce the words accurately. In language people do that today....lose a letter here and there "Para atras" "Pa' tras", "La acera", "La cera".


It's Yaye not Yaay. I don't think it's Creole but any of us could be wrong. Of course they recorded in many different languages, but the reason why I gave my opinion was because....again, the song was dedicated to Aragon. I just doubt it would be in a language not know to Aragon.

Thanks for engaging in thought with me on this subject. It's great to listen to "all opinions", valid or not! It is in researching when what is believed to be true can become false and what was false can become true! That is why any idea should be welcomed and not dismissed in the way that mine was.
 
#31
msjanemas said:
It's Yaye not Yaay.
I didn't (and don't) intend to pretend that I know definitively about a language that I don't understand. However, if you go back to my opening post, you'll notice that I mentioned both "Yay Boy" and "Yaye Boy" as possible titles for the song. That's because I have the song on two different CDs at home -- one of which lists it one way, and one of which lists it the other way. Googling "Africando" with "Yay Boy" turns up more hits than Googling "Africando" with "Yaye Boy." So, honestly, that's the reason why I picked one over the other when titling this thread and in my references throughout this thread.

msjanemas said:
I don't think it's Creole but any of us could be wrong. Of course they recorded in many different languages, but the reason why I gave my opinion was because....again, the song was dedicated to Aragon. I just doubt it would be in a language not know to Aragon.
I could be wrong also, but I think you're working backwards in your assumptions. I've seen a couple of Internet references to the fact that Orquesta Aragon was the one who copied it from Africando -- not the other way around. I tend to believe those sources in light of the fact that the vocalist (Pape Seck) was from Senegal, and Senegalese Wolof speakers find very close associations with words like "Yay," "Bay," "Mam," "Boy," "Paal Ma," etc. -- whereas there is almost no close association with any Spanish words. Even dialects or "creole" versions of a language still tend to have significant overlaps with the original, which this song does not have with Spanish. In other words, I have no reason to believe that this song is full of "jibberish," "mumbo jumbo," or is simply the equivalent of scatting.

I'm still keeping my fingers crossed that we'll come up with an English translation before this thread dies.... :(
 
#33
msjanemas said:
it was a dedication to Arragon and that is a known fact.
Is there any Internet link that you can direct us to? I hadn't heard that before.

One of the places where I got my information was the 11th paragraph on this webpage:

http://www.technobeat.com/HUCKER/BIRTH.html

technobeat said:
A beautiful example of the circular nature of Afro-Cuban music and what goes round comes round is on a cd by veteran Cuban charanga band Orquesta Aragon. Quien Sabe Sabe (Lusafrica) features a version of Africando's "Yay Boy" which they have copied phonetically from the Wolof original. So you get a Cuban group copying a African group copying Cuban music, although in reality it was more a case of continuing the tradition because Aragon had toured extensively throughout West Africa in the 60s....
 
#34
Big10, those cd's of yours, are compilations? do they have the usual song info?. They should hold composer's info for the songs ... unless they are compilations.

msjanemas, engaging in thought is the purpose of being here! No need to thank! ... and ... if you initially felt that your idea was beeing dismissed ... take into account that we are all hoping we're able to find a translation!. So, at least, i am hoping you are wrong!

The "yay" vs "yaye" thing might be just a transcription/translitaration thing.
 
#35
alvaro said:
Big10, those cd's of yours, are compilations? do they have the usual song info?. They should hold composer's info for the songs ... unless they are compilations.
Yes, they are compilations. One is called Afro-Latino (a GREAT album compiled by Putumayo) and the other one is African Salsa (kind of a disappointing album, for my tastes).

So, I don't know much more than what I've already posted. Believe me, if I had more information to help us get to the bottom of this mystery, I would share it! :wink:
 
#36
So you get a Cuban group copying a African group copying Cuban music, although in reality it was more a case of continuing the tradition because Aragon had toured extensively throughout West Africa in the 60s.
Now everyone knows that is soooo wrong and CONFUSING to say Arragon was copying African groups copying Cuban groups. It makes no sense. It's like saying I'm copying you copying me dancing! No sense at all...just words to confuse the reader on who credit for the style of music should go to.
 
#37
AFRICANDO
Melodie/1993

Africando is a meeting between four of West Africa’s most important salsa musicians and pioneers within Afro-Cuban music. They come from various ethnic groups and countries: Pape Seck, Medoune Jalow and Nicholas Menheim from Senegal, Boncana Maiga from Mali.
In the 1960s and early 70s Latin American Salsa and Rumba were the hottest dance music in Senegal and a large part of Africa. Musicians at that time used also to sing in Spanish - as a tribute to the musical form’s roots -but that was more by luck than management, if you know what I mean? Since those days African music has found its own roots and created new AFRICAN musical forms, not least in Senegal where people like Youssou N’Dour and Thione Seck are still developing and stretching these roots, if in different directions. But the Latino sound has become part of today’s musicians’ roots, and it’s good that it’s become so important that Senegalese singers work together on such a project, under the direction of Mali’s brilliant arranger and “kapelmeister”, Boncana Maiga. He worked for nine years in Cuba and clearly knows what he is doing. And it’s not only him; the musicians here have obviously crossed the pond for, when the trumpeter’s name is Hector Bomberito Zarzuela, one knows it is not just the music that is Cuban! The singers here are among Senegal’s most gifted vocalists with backing from Star Band, Orchestra Baobab and Youssou N’Dour’s Super Etoile. The result is glimmering salsa, in fact, and I especially feel that Pape Seck’s armoured voice plays perfectly up against the music’s perfect sound, creating a driving Latino dance mood, full to the brim with the best from Cuba and Colombia. That all this is in addition to the unstoppable Ibrahim Sylla’s production shouldn’t shock you. Just enjoy these guys’ polished and over- exaggerated sound, for Sylla has clearly made sure that Senor Maiga had everything under control and let him do his stuff. A glittering album!

Arne Berg

http://www.leopardmannen.no/a/africando.asp
 
#38
msjanemas said:
So you get a Cuban group copying a African group copying Cuban music, although in reality it was more a case of continuing the tradition because Aragon had toured extensively throughout West Africa in the 60s.
Now everyone knows that is soooo wrong and CONFUSING to say Arragon was copying African groups copying Cuban groups. It makes no sense. It's like saying I'm copying you copying me dancing! No sense at all...just words to confuse the reader on who credit for the style of music should go to.
Perhaps it could have been written more clearly, but I understood it to say that a Cuban group (Aragon) was copying a specific song ("Yay Boy") from an African group (Africando) -- even though the African group had been doing its own imitation of a musical style from Cuba (Salsa/Son).

I don't think it was an attempt to confuse the reader or conceal proper credit. The writer seemed to be making the point that these bands were simply following a tradition of using influences from both Cuba and Africa. In other words, no single country/region should get all the credit for songs that sound like "Yay Boy." The liner notes for one of the albums I mentioned before (Afro-Latino) does a good job of emphasizing the mutual influences as well.
 
#39
I'm still trying to find that comment, but here's something else in the meantime:

Africando is part of the interesting phenomenon of rhythms that come and go from the Americas. It is well known that salsa and Caribbean rhythms have African roots. But it is also true that a lot of modern African music owes a lot of its influences to salsa and Cuban son.

Africando is a group that brings together African and Caribbean cultures together. It was formed in 1992 by Senegalese and Latin musicians who met each other thanks to Malian flautist Boncana Maiga. Maiga loved Cuban music ever since he visited the island as an exchange student. Boncana Maiga and producer Ibrahima Sylla brought together three Senegalese singers: Nicolas Menheim, Pape Seck (from the Star Band de Dakar) and Medoune Diallo, who used to be the lead singer for Orchestre Baobab. Boncana Maiga recruited some of the best New york-based salsa musicians: Adalberto Santiago, Yayo el Indio, Ronnie Baró, Sergio George, Johnny Torres, Bobby Allende, Bomberito Zarzuela, Papo Pepín and many others who have played with well known bands such as Orquesta Broadway, Fania All Stars, Sonora Matancera, Sonora Ponceña or the Tito Puente, Eddie Palmieri and Cachao bands.

The result of this incredible gathering of talented musicians was an album titled "Trovador" sung in a new language that the Senegalese musicians wolofspañol (a mixture of Senegalese Wolof and Spanish). A song from Africando’s second album, "Tierra tradicional," reached the top of New York’s Latin charts.

In 1995, one of the Senegalese singers, Pape Seck, sadly died and the remaining two singers had to look for a replacement. Instead of one they found two: singer Gnonnas Pedro, from Benin and Ronnie Baró, singer of the Orquesta Broadway, brother-in-law of Boncana Maiga and a collaborator with the band since the very beginning.

On the latest albums, more guest singers were invited, such as Sekouba Bambino, Medoune Diallo, Amadou Balaké and Koffi Olomide, which led to the new name Africando All Stars.

While in the beginning the songs were Latin classics sung in Wolof or a mix of Wolof and Spanish, the newer songs were primarily African classics, redone with Latin rhythms and instrumentation. With both approaches, Africando has been equally successful.
 
#40
It said copying Music. It's clear that the music is Cuban as they've repeatedly mentioned. No doubt there's a touch of senegal musical roots in some of the songs (not referring to the singers who by the way sing in the style of SON phrasing). A writer knows how to use the words, "composition" if that was the case. I wasn't referring to the song Yaye Boy, I was referring to the comment "Copying Music". If a writer of music knows his work then he should of said Cover tunes. That is the proper terminology. But this is sort of off the subject...like most articles who are not specifically clear, so I shouldn't continue.

It could be in their language... Seriously as soon as I can get in touch with Mr. Pepin I will ask him for you, and a translation if possible.
 

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