Your Bloodtype

Joe

Well-Known Member
#43
Read an article in the Post yesterday about some new method under trial using enzymes to break down the sugars that coat the red blood cells so that they're all turned into Type O. Apparently both A and B have distinct sugars that "poison" the RBCs when transfused into a host of the opposite type. This new, inexpensive method is supposed to work at reasonable temperatures and pH, also. Sounds like a good thing for everyone, and O donors may not be in such high demand anymore.
 
#44
Read an article in the Post yesterday about some new method under trial using enzymes to break down the sugars that coat the red blood cells so that they're all turned into Type O. Apparently both A and B have distinct sugars that "poison" the RBCs when transfused into a host of the opposite type. This new, inexpensive method is supposed to work at reasonable temperatures and pH, also. Sounds like a good thing for everyone, and O donors may not be in such high demand anymore.
I better ask my hubby who occasionally works in blood bank... never heard such thing before. Interesting.
I don't know my type. MH offered to get some blood from me at home and bring it to work when it's slow and type it, but I'd hate him forever for doing that...
 

mamboqueen

Well-Known Member
#45
Read an article in the Post yesterday about some new method under trial using enzymes to break down the sugars that coat the red blood cells so that they're all turned into Type O. Apparently both A and B have distinct sugars that "poison" the RBCs when transfused into a host of the opposite type. This new, inexpensive method is supposed to work at reasonable temperatures and pH, also. Sounds like a good thing for everyone, and O donors may not be in such high demand anymore.
I heard about this on TV yesterday, too. I don't know if I want people messing with my blood just yet...although I'm happy for them to try it out on others :)
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#46
Read an article in the Post yesterday about some new method under trial using enzymes to break down the sugars that coat the red blood cells so that they're all turned into Type O. Apparently both A and B have distinct sugars that "poison" the RBCs when transfused into a host of the opposite type. This new, inexpensive method is supposed to work at reasonable temperatures and pH, also. Sounds like a good thing for everyone, and O donors may not be in such high demand anymore.
That sounds awesome.

Especially the inexpensive, reasonable temps, and ph bits...sounds ideal for battlefield conditions, or third-world nations.
 

Joe

Well-Known Member
#47
I heard about this on TV yesterday, too. I don't know if I want people messing with my blood just yet...although I'm happy for them to try it out on others :)
Well, it was just the trial where they futzed with your blood and put it back in you. I'm sure "in the field" there would be no reason to put your own blood back in you--they'd put it in the person that needed it.
 

mamboqueen

Well-Known Member
#48
Well, it was just the trial where they futzed with your blood and put it back in you. I'm sure "in the field" there would be no reason to put your own blood back in you--they'd put it in the person that needed it.
you know, given how they remove the wrong kidney,or amputate the wrong leg (or there was a worse one on the news this week involving a man), or the couple that was hispanic/caucasian and went through in vitro (with *his sperm*) only to have an African American baby, I am so leery about medical procedures and what goes into my body that came out of someone else's. Well, a few exceptions...*LOL*
 
#49
I'm sure "in the field" there would be no reason to put your own blood back in you--they'd put it in the person that needed it.
Actually, any time they put someone else's blood in you, you have a pretty good chance of developing antibodies, which makes it more difficult to get a match next time you need blood. For people constantly having blood transfusions it make take half a day to get a preliminary match because of the number of antibodies involved, and that becomes a problem if you live in a smaller city, get into a serious accident or need an emergency surgery. Therefore, the best thing a reasonably healthy person can do when going into a scheduled surgery is to get his or her blood collected and stored in case it is needed (but it will get discarded if it's not used then).
 

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