Can one get teacher certifications without actually having students?

#1
The title says it all. The reason why I ask is because I compete as an amateur with my girlfriend, who became a dance instructor a year ago. However, she doesn't have any certifications yet. But her boss said once she does become certified, then she'll be considered professional and can no longer compete with me as an amateur.

First off, how true is that statement? I guess it would depend on who sanctions the comps we'd be doing. Also, would it be unethical for me get certified just so I can be considered professional and continue to do comps with my girlfriend? I wouldn't think it would be ... but what do I know ...
 

FancyFeet

Well-Known Member
#3
Nor do you ever need to have taught a student to call yourself a pro.

Heads-up that there are, however, often fairly strict rules about what you are allowed to do and still compete as an amateur. That will depend on where you live and what federation you belong to, as well as the specific requirements of any given competition.
 
#4
I was a little confused by the title and then the text in the first paragraph. You said she became a dance instructor a year ago, and you also said in the title that she does not have any students?
 

SwingingAlong

Well-Known Member
#5
I our country we can teach and remain an amateur, but there are very strict guidelines around what and how, and permission is required from the national body.
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#7
The title says it all. The reason why I ask is because I compete as an amateur with my girlfriend, who became a dance instructor a year ago. However, she doesn't have any certifications yet.
IF she gets paid for teaching then that changes the dynamic. There is a rule in place ( States side ) where Amat. are permitted to teach with strict guidlines.

Getting certified on the other hand does NOT make one a teacher, if you do not teach. An exam is only a test of ones dance knowledge in the area you choose to be examined ( Latin, Smooth etc ) . What one does with that qualif. determines the outcome .

Here's the other side of that "coin". There are Prof. competitors who never taught after they retired..
 

snapdancer

Well-Known Member
#8
In my review of USA Dance rulebooks, back in the 90s when the organization was called USABDA there were strict rules for amateurs teaching since one of the "A"s in USABDA stood for amateur. Then the olympics came about and the word "Amateur" was excised from the rulebooks to be replaced with "Athlete". USA Dance does not have "amateurs" anymore even though you will find the word used in a few locations including the O2CM software used to manage competitions. It has "athletes" and "professionals".

NDCA does have pro/am dancers in which one partner is a professional and the other is called a "pro/am student dancer" who is strictly prohibited from teaching. Getting a teacher certification could complicate being able to compete as a "pro/am student dancer".

Both NDCA and USA Dance have the same definition for a professional but don't really say professional "what". Some will say that the "what" is "competitor", not "dancer". So she may be able to both teach dance and compete as an "amateur" or "athlete" so long as she hasn't declared herself to be a professional -- which would be the case if she danced as the professional partner of a pro/am competitive couple. She could not teach dance and compete as the student dancer partner of a pro/am competitive couple.

But as far as holding teaching certificates, actually teaching, and also competing as an "athlete" or "amateur" couple, I think you can get away with that in both NDCA and USA Dance but you should ask them directly to make sure. For myself, I've seen it happen and the possibility that I would be competing against a dance teacher is one factor that makes me less interested in competing myself.
 

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