Is there an incentive to adjudicate?

#1
I've had two different coaches tell me that adjudicating at competitions is the "worst paid job" in the dance industry, comparatively speaking. For instance, teaching, competing pro-am, and/or organizing a competition seem to be more productive uses of a professional's time in terms of earning money. However, I look at larger competitions and high-level professionals are adjudicating them all the time. Are all these jobs low-paid? If so, are there other incentives - besides personal enjoyment - that professionals adjudicate? I'm wondering if there's some kind of exchange that happens ("If you adjudicate my competition, I'll come adjudicate yours") or if adjudicating somehow promotes a professional's visibility or strengthens their voice in the dance community. I'm not sure!
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#2
I've had two different coaches tell me that adjudicating at competitions is the "worst paid job" in the dance industry,

and high-level professionals are adjudicating them all the time.

Are all these jobs low-paid? If so, are there other incentives - besides personal enjoyment - that professionals adjudicate?

I'm wondering if there's some kind of exchange that happens
True..

ALL the time ?.. I think not, frequently for some, yes . Normally ,the former National, B/pool and World champs are in constant demand .

Exposure sometimes leads to work..
 

bia

Well-Known Member
#3
I'm sure it increases visibility as a coach, at least for those without the very highest previous competition results. When I take coaching from a certified adjudicator, I know I'm getting guidance from someone who knows what the judges are looking for. I know some competitive dancers schedule lessons with specific judges who tend to mark them low, as an opportunity to find out what it is they're not liking. (I don't pick my coaching that strategically myself; I think our faults are obvious enough to any good coach at this point!)
 

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