What are you currently 'working on' in A.T.?-Vol.II

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
Peaches,
And yes, of course we've had this discussion before but in my view we agree more than disagree and any disagreement is only about degree and I'm quite happy to agree to disagree about such a subtlety. Being a good follow, I'm sure you can follow that!
!
are you working on Groucho Marx impersonation? :lol:

I'm working on stepover colgadas; got some really nice ones going with my belly dancer friend

and the embrace...
 

JohnEm

Well-Known Member
Grouch

And yes, of course we've had this discussion before but in my view we agree more than disagree and any disagreement is only about degree and I'm quite happy to agree to disagree about such a subtlety. Being a good follow, I'm sure you can follow that!
are you working on Groucho Marx impersonation? :lol:
I don't impersonate anyone . . . can be impertinent though! :tongue:
 

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
Went to an interesting class recently on homo-lateral movement. They started out by reviewing natural walking movement with everyone (hetero-lateral, or contra-body if you prefer) then they told everyone to switch it up such that the same side of the torso was moving forward as the leg. At first, it felt like a frankenstein walk. :) But then the teachers pointed out that walking like this is weird and unnatural if you're doing it by accident; if you move smoothly, deliberately, and add a little more pivot, you end up with something that feels interesting and different but not at all weird and awful.

It also opens up a few new possibilities in steps. When you do it right, it looks very dramatic. Perhaps more suited for performances, but I could see throwing it in occasionally in a social dance with the right partner.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
Went to an interesting class recently on homo-lateral movement. They started out by reviewing natural walking movement with everyone (hetero-lateral, or contra-body if you prefer) then they told everyone to switch it up such that the same side of the torso was moving forward as the leg. At first, it felt like a frankenstein walk. :) But then the teachers pointed out that walking like this is weird and unnatural if you're doing it by accident; if you move smoothly, deliberately, and add a little more pivot, you end up with something that feels interesting and different but not at all weird and awful.

It also opens up a few new possibilities in steps. When you do it right, it looks very dramatic. Perhaps more suited for performances, but I could see throwing it in occasionally in a social dance with the right partner.
A while back I tried to determine how I "naturally" walk (spurred by conversations about contra-body movement and other stuff). I found that I had to get myself to think about something else (like a song, movie, or anything other than walking), otherwise it skewed things.

What I concluded (for me). When walking forward, the answer varied, depending on the state of my hands. If my hands were free, more times than not, my arms would have some contra-body motion, and my shoulders would have a little (most of the time any ways). However, if my hands were kept in front of me (with my fingers intertwined), I had no detectable contra-body motion. BTW, when walking backwards, I had the frankenstein thing going.

What that all means, no clue.

;)
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
A while back I tried to determine how I "naturally" walk (spurred by conversations about contra-body movement and other stuff). I found that I had to get myself to think about something else (like a song, movie, or anything other than walking), otherwise it skewed things.

What I concluded (for me). When walking forward, the answer varied, depending on the state of my hands. If my hands were free, more times than not, my arms would have some contra-body motion, and my shoulders would have a little (most of the time any ways). However, if my hands were kept in front of me (with my fingers intertwined), I had no detectable contra-body motion. BTW, when walking backwards, I had the frankenstein thing going.

What that all means, no clue.
I would be willing to bet that, if your weren't thinking about walking, you would have contra-body motion, whether going forward or back. And, if you had your hands in front of you but were not watching them, such as if you were carrying a beach ball, you would have contra-body motion. The only time some people don't have it is when they start analyzing it.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
I would be willing to bet that, if your weren't thinking about walking, you would have contra-body motion, whether going forward or back. And, if you had your hands in front of you but were not watching them, such as if you were carrying a beach ball, you would have contra-body motion. The only time some people don't have it is when they start analyzing it.
When I thought about walking (as I posted), it would skew things toward whatever style or motion I might be thinking about. That's why I had to think about something else for while and (hopefully) remember to then think about what I was doing. For me, doing contra-body motion in tango was very un-natural, and I had more than one teacher trying to correct it (I was just as likely to do the Frankenstein thing, as contra body). Actually (to a slow song), I can occasionally do it now without having to spend too much time thinking about it, but more times than not, I'll end up doing a different motion (raising on the side that I'm stepping on), or no extra movement at all.
 

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
A while back I tried to determine how I "naturally" walk (spurred by conversations about contra-body movement and other stuff). I found that I had to get myself to think about something else (like a song, movie, or anything other than walking), otherwise it skewed things.

What I concluded (for me). When walking forward, the answer varied, depending on the state of my hands. If my hands were free, more times than not, my arms would have some contra-body motion, and my shoulders would have a little (most of the time any ways). However, if my hands were kept in front of me (with my fingers intertwined), I had no detectable contra-body motion. BTW, when walking backwards, I had the frankenstein thing going.

What that all means, no clue.

;)
I totally understand. :) I still have trouble with the darned backwards CBM. I just practice the movement all the time now, maybe one of these days it will feel natural. Heh.
 

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
Boleos! Wow, these are a lot simpler than I thought. In every group class I've seen them in, it's all jerky and snappy. The first one I learned was almost gentle and really flowed with the movement.

Also, working on dynamic turns and sacadas in the turn again. Always pick up a little more each time we do them.
 

Zoopsia59

Well-Known Member
I'm working on getting the aging curve which takes my ability downward, and the experience and development curve (which should take my ability upwards) to balance in something that at least stays stable across the graph, and preferably results in an upward trend..

Not being sarcastic or snarky... seriously... this is a problem for me these days... the line on the graph is heading downward!
 

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
Altering direction in mid-step. Whee.

ETA: Sheesh, I have a lot of new stuff to work on. I kind of think of it as treating myself, as I've been focusing hard on walking and embrace for the past 5 months.
 

Subliminal

Well-Known Member
Putting it all together. Had some breakthroughs recently, but it's all kind of a jumbled mess in my head right now. Gotta find a way to get it all to stick. I think I might just need more practice time.

Also, I think I really understand sacadas in the giro now. Understanding and doing isn't quite the same thing though...
 

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